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Prince Charles wraps up New Zealand tour with llama walkabout ahead of showdown with Prince Andrew

UK News

The Prince of Wales got up close and personal with a pair of llamas during his last day in New Zealand, before enjoying the beautiful sights and wildlife of Kaikoura on the South Island.

Charles, 71, and Camilla, 72, began the day in Christchurch, visiting the Lincoln Farmers and Craft Market where the royal signed a young boy’s arm cast before the prince took a helicopter north to Kaikoura.

The town of around 2,000 people was struck by a 7.8-magnitude earthquake in 2016, and the prince met people who were among the first responders on the evening the tremor struck.

Saturday is the prince’s last day in New Zealand before he heads to the Soloman Islands to complete his eight-day tour. He will then fly home to face an expected showdown with brother Prince Andrew over the Epstein scandal.

Prince Charles, 71, continued his tour of New Zealand on Saturday by visiting Kaikoura on the South Island, where he was met with a traditional welcome ceremony at Takahanga Marae

Prince Charles, 71, continued his tour of New Zealand on Saturday by visiting Kaikoura on the South Island, where he was met with a traditional welcome ceremony at Takahanga Marae

Prince Charles, 71, continued his tour of New Zealand on Saturday by visiting Kaikoura on the South Island, where he was met with a traditional welcome ceremony at Takahanga Marae

The Prince of Wales met the White Ribbon Riders, who are on their annual motorcycle ride raising awareness of domestic violence, with one of them telling Prince Charles 'I can see you riding one of these', which appeared to entertain the royal

The Prince of Wales met the White Ribbon Riders, who are on their annual motorcycle ride raising awareness of domestic violence, with one of them telling Prince Charles 'I can see you riding one of these', which appeared to entertain the royal

The Prince of Wales met the White Ribbon Riders, who are on their annual motorcycle ride raising awareness of domestic violence, with one of them telling Prince Charles ‘I can see you riding one of these’, which appeared to entertain the royal

After visiting the Soloman Islands tomorrow, Charles will fly home to face an expected showdown with brother Prince Andrew over the Epstein scandal. The Duke of York is pictured horse riding with the Queen at Windsor Park on Friday

After visiting the Soloman Islands tomorrow, Charles will fly home to face an expected showdown with brother Prince Andrew over the Epstein scandal. The Duke of York is pictured horse riding with the Queen at Windsor Park on Friday

After visiting the Soloman Islands tomorrow, Charles will fly home to face an expected showdown with brother Prince Andrew over the Epstein scandal. The Duke of York is pictured horse riding with the Queen at Windsor Park on Friday

Charles laughed as the llamas, who usually give visitors rides around the town, were ushered into place for a picture during his stop in Kaikoura on Saturday

Charles laughed as the llamas, who usually give visitors rides around the town, were ushered into place for a picture during his stop in Kaikoura on Saturday

Charles laughed as the llamas, who usually give visitors rides around the town, were ushered into place for a picture during his stop in Kaikoura on Saturday

On Saturday afternoon Charles was shown around the town of Kaikoura, where he met locals as well as animals including friendly llamas.

‘I’m joining the line again,’ one of the coastguard team said as she went for a second handshake, to which Charles joked: ‘You must be a glutton for punishment.’

It was outside the Kaikoura Memorial Hall where Charles was introduced to Legend and Max, a pair of llamas who work giving rides in the town.

Charles laughed as the llamas were ushered into place for a picture, with Kevin Cole of Kaikoura Llama Trekking saying he purposely chose the best-behaved pair for the royal visit.

Saturday was the seventh day of the eight-day tour, which will now continue to the Soloman Islands before the Prince and his wife Camilla, 72, fly back to the UK. Pictured is Charles receiving a hongi at Takahanga Marae in Kaikoura

Saturday was the seventh day of the eight-day tour, which will now continue to the Soloman Islands before the Prince and his wife Camilla, 72, fly back to the UK. Pictured is Charles receiving a hongi at Takahanga Marae in Kaikoura

Saturday was the seventh day of the eight-day tour, which will now continue to the Soloman Islands before the Prince and his wife Camilla, 72, fly back to the UK. Pictured is Charles receiving a hongi at Takahanga Marae in Kaikoura

The royal spoke with members of the St John Ambulance during a public walk and also spoke with first responders to the 7.8-magnitude earthquake which struck the town of Kaikoura in 2016

The royal spoke with members of the St John Ambulance during a public walk and also spoke with first responders to the 7.8-magnitude earthquake which struck the town of Kaikoura in 2016

The royal spoke with members of the St John Ambulance during a public walk and also spoke with first responders to the 7.8-magnitude earthquake which struck the town of Kaikoura in 2016

Prince Charles received a Hongi, a traditional Maori greeting, when he arrived at the town of around 2,000 people after taking a helicopter ride from Christchurch earlier on Saturday

Prince Charles received a Hongi, a traditional Maori greeting, when he arrived at the town of around 2,000 people after taking a helicopter ride from Christchurch earlier on Saturday

Prince Charles received a Hongi, a traditional Maori greeting, when he arrived at the town of around 2,000 people after taking a helicopter ride from Christchurch earlier on Saturday

The Prince of Wales talked with the Orange Army, who helped to rebuild the local roads after the earthquake, in Kaikoura

The Prince of Wales talked with the Orange Army, who helped to rebuild the local roads after the earthquake, in Kaikoura

The Prince of Wales talked with the Orange Army, who helped to rebuild the local roads after the earthquake, in Kaikoura

The heir to the throne also met two well behaved llamas, called Legend and Max, during the trip and appeared to be in good spirits as the animals were arranged for a picture

The heir to the throne also met two well behaved llamas, called Legend and Max, during the trip and appeared to be in good spirits as the animals were arranged for a picture

The heir to the throne also met two well behaved llamas, called Legend and Max, during the trip and appeared to be in good spirits as the animals were arranged for a picture

‘When I knew he was visiting, I had to make sure I chose the best llamas from a characteristic and placidity point of view. I was very impressed by how much he knew about them too,’ he said. 

Hundreds of people came to see Charles as he completed a walkabout in the town centre, shaking hands and greeting locals as well as those who said they were from Bath, Manchester and Italy.

It was also during the visit to Kaikoura Square that the prince met the White Ribbon Riders, who are taking part in a motorcycle tour in support of programmes against domestic violence.

Charles was heard to joke with rider Tiki O’Brien that it looked like a Hell’s Angels chapter as the riders showed off their Harley Davidsons, Hondas and Triumphs.

The Prince of Wales met some of the White Ribbon Riders, a group who are taking part in a motorcycle tour in support of programmes against domestic violence, during his walk around Kaikoura on Saturday

The Prince of Wales met some of the White Ribbon Riders, a group who are taking part in a motorcycle tour in support of programmes against domestic violence, during his walk around Kaikoura on Saturday

The Prince of Wales met some of the White Ribbon Riders, a group who are taking part in a motorcycle tour in support of programmes against domestic violence, during his walk around Kaikoura on Saturday

During the visit Charles was also shown traditional wood carvings inside the meeting house at Takahanga Marae in Kaikoura

During the visit Charles was also shown traditional wood carvings inside the meeting house at Takahanga Marae in Kaikoura

During the visit Charles was also shown traditional wood carvings inside the meeting house at Takahanga Marae in Kaikoura

The royal appeared to be enthralled by the colourful wood carvings during the visit on the seventh day of the tour

The royal appeared to be enthralled by the colourful wood carvings during the visit on the seventh day of the tour

The royal appeared to be enthralled by the colourful wood carvings during the visit on the seventh day of the tour

Eru Whare told the prince: ‘I can see you riding one of these,’ which raised a smile from the royal. 

Charles went on to visit Hutton’s Shearwater Colony, one of two breeding colonies for the endangered seabird in the area.

Ted Howard, chairman of the Hutton’s Shearwater Charitable Trust, opened an artificially created underground burrow to show Charles one of the birds, the only seabird in the world to breed in an alpine environment.

‘I’ve lost quite a lot of blood to these,’ he joked as he held the bird while Charles stroked it.

Predatory mammals have seen the population fall significantly and the earthquake destroyed breeding sites further hampering conservation efforts. 

Charles looked smart in Kaikoura, donning a dapper grey suit with a patterned blue tie and smart black brogues

Charles looked smart in Kaikoura, donning a dapper grey suit with a patterned blue tie and smart black brogues

Charles looked smart in Kaikoura, donning a dapper grey suit with a patterned blue tie and smart black brogues 

The Prince of Wales was full of smiles as he took part in a public walk around Kaikoura, New Zealand, on Saturday afternoon

The Prince of Wales was full of smiles as he took part in a public walk around Kaikoura, New Zealand, on Saturday afternoon

The Prince of Wales was full of smiles as he took part in a public walk around Kaikoura, New Zealand, on Saturday afternoon 

In the afternoon, Charles went for a 30-minute coastal walk lead by Phil Bradfield and Rawiri Manawatu where the toyal could see seals and blue penguins from the path

In the afternoon, Charles went for a 30-minute coastal walk lead by Phil Bradfield and Rawiri Manawatu where the toyal could see seals and blue penguins from the path

In the afternoon, Charles went for a 30-minute coastal walk lead by Phil Bradfield and Rawiri Manawatu where the toyal could see seals and blue penguins from the path

Charles’s last engagement on the New Zealand leg of the tour was a picturesque coastal walk in Kaikoura. 

He stopped and took in the views of the Kaikoura ranges and looked out to the Pacific Ocean.

The prince, led by Phil Bradfield and Rawiri Manawatu, spent around 30 minutes walking along the coast, with seals and blue penguins visible from the path.

He will now travel to the Solomon Islands for the last leg of the tour. Charles will return the the UK on Monday and it is thought he will then speak with his younger brother Prince Andrew, 59.

Prince Charles spent time taking in the scenery on Saturday. Since the 2016 earthquake predatory mammals have seen the population fall significantly as the tremor destroyed breeding sites

Prince Charles spent time taking in the scenery on Saturday. Since the 2016 earthquake predatory mammals have seen the population fall significantly as the tremor destroyed breeding sites

Prince Charles spent time taking in the scenery on Saturday. Since the 2016 earthquake predatory mammals have seen the population fall significantly as the tremor destroyed breeding sites

While at the Hutton's Shearwater Colony chairman Ted Howard opened an artificially created underground burrow to show Charles one of the birds, the only seabird in the world to breed in an alpine environment

While at the Hutton's Shearwater Colony chairman Ted Howard opened an artificially created underground burrow to show Charles one of the birds, the only seabird in the world to breed in an alpine environment

While at the Hutton’s Shearwater Colony chairman Ted Howard opened an artificially created underground burrow to show Charles one of the birds, the only seabird in the world to breed in an alpine environment

Charles stopped during the coastal walk to take in the views of the Kaikoura ranges and looked out to the Pacific Ocean

Charles stopped during the coastal walk to take in the views of the Kaikoura ranges and looked out to the Pacific Ocean

Charles stopped during the coastal walk to take in the views of the Kaikoura ranges and looked out to the Pacific Ocean

Experts told MailOnline that the Prince of Wales will be fuming with his brother after the bungled BBC Newsnight interview and his decision to invite his ex-wife Sarah, Duchess of York, to Buckingham Palace.

Royal author Phil Dampier said: ‘I’m sure when Charles returns from New Zealand he will sit Andrew down and read him the riot act’.

While Tom Bower, author of the explosive biography of Charles, the ‘Rebel Prince’, told MailOnline: ‘There’s no love lost between Charles and Andrew and I’m certain they will meet. 

‘Charles will be furious that his trip to New Zealand has been completely overshadowed. The one thing Charles is determined to do is inherit the crown and he won’t let anyone get in the way’. 

Prince Charles, pictured on the coastal walk at Kaikoura Peninsula on Saturday, will now head to the Soloman Islands

Prince Charles, pictured on the coastal walk at Kaikoura Peninsula on Saturday, will now head to the Soloman Islands

Prince Charles, pictured on the coastal walk at Kaikoura Peninsula on Saturday, will now head to the Soloman Islands

DailyMail Online


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