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Prosecutors will examine ‘show trial’ claims following Love Island host’s suicide 

UK News

An investigation is to be launched into whether prosecutors were right to press ahead with Caroline Flack‘s ‘show trial’ following her death. 

The Love Island host killed herself on February 15 just one day after she found out the Crown Prosecution Service was pursuing the court case against her. 

There will now be ‘a post-case review panel conducted by a deputy chief crown prosecutor’ to determine whether it should have pursued the case, a freedom of information request has revealed. 

It follows criticism over the CPS’s handling of the case, including from Flack’s boyfriend Lewis Burton who said he ‘never supported’ a prosecution. 

The Love Island host (pictured) killed herself on February 15 just one day after she found out the Crown Prosecution Service was pursuing the court case against her

The Love Island host (pictured) killed herself on February 15 just one day after she found out the Crown Prosecution Service was pursuing the court case against her

The Love Island host (pictured) killed herself on February 15 just one day after she found out the Crown Prosecution Service was pursuing the court case against her

The decision follows criticism over the CPS's handling of the case, including from Flack's boyfriend Lewis Burton (pictured together) who said he 'never supported' a prosecution

The decision follows criticism over the CPS's handling of the case, including from Flack's boyfriend Lewis Burton (pictured together) who said he 'never supported' a prosecution

The decision follows criticism over the CPS’s handling of the case, including from Flack’s boyfriend Lewis Burton (pictured together) who said he ‘never supported’ a prosecution

A spokesman for the CPS told the Mirror: ‘The review will look at the general CPS handling of the case and, obviously, the decisions behind charging is part of that.’ 

In the days after her death Flack’s management team described her as ‘vulnerable’ and criticised the CPS for pushing ahead with the case despite her boyfriend Lewis Burton saying he did not want to press charges. 

He had said she hit him with a lamp at her former home in Islington in December and as part of her bail conditions the pair were banned from contacting each other. 

But he later spoke out in defence of Flack, saying she has become the subject of a ‘witch hunt’ following her arrest. 

A member of Flack’s management team said the CPS should ‘look at themselves’ and how they pursued a trial ‘without merit’ which resulted in ‘significant distress to Caroline’.

The saga surrounding her court case saw her ‘step down’ from hosting Love Island.  

Friends of the presenter, who was paid a £1.2million salary for Love Island, said she had been terrified of her impending court date. ‘She was on her own. She couldn’t take it anymore. Her family are devastated,’ one friend told The Mirror.

Another added: ‘Caroline couldn’t bear the thought of going through the court case. She felt her career would never recover from this – and she felt humiliated in front of the world. In the end she just couldn’t see a way out. She didn’t know how to fix herself.’

Caroline Flack pictured leaving Highbury Corner Magistrates' Court in North London in December 2019

Caroline Flack pictured leaving Highbury Corner Magistrates' Court in North London in December 2019

Caroline Flack pictured leaving Highbury Corner Magistrates’ Court in North London in December 2019

Flack’s friends were said to be furious that the CPS pursued the presenter’s prosecution despite Burton making it clear he did not want the case to go to trial as there had been no serious injury.

Her management criticised the CPS in a statement. Francis Ridley, of Money Talent Management, said: ‘We are devastated at the loss of our client and friend Caroline Flack.

‘The Crown Prosecution Service pursued this when they knew not only how very vulnerable Caroline was but also that the alleged victim did not support the prosecution and had disputed the CPS version of events.

‘The CPS should look at themselves today and how they pursued a show trial that was not only without merit but not in the public interest. And ultimately resulted in significant distress to Caroline. Our thoughts are with Caroline’s family at this time.

‘An immensely talented young woman who was at the top of her game professionally and loved by television viewers across the country. In recent months Caroline had been under huge pressure because of an ongoing case and potential trial which has been well reported.’

The CPS told MailOnline in a statement at the time: ‘Our deepest sympathies go to the family and friends of Caroline Flack. Given the tragic circumstances, we will not comment on the specifics of this case at this stage.’ 

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123 or visit a local Samaritans branch, see www.samaritans.org for details. 

DailyMail Online


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