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Panic-buyers show off pantries full of groceries as they stockpile ahead of coronavirus epidemic

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Australians are panic-buying items such as toilet paper, pasta and medication due to coronavirus.

Images have shown empty shelves and trolleys filled to the brim at major supermarkets such as Coles and Woolworths as people rush to fill their pantries. 

One mother, Leanne McLennan, shared images to Facebook of her stockpile that she has been building for five years. 

One mother, Leanne McLennan, shared images to Facebook of her stockpile that she has been building for five years

One mother, Leanne McLennan, shared images to Facebook of her stockpile that she has been building for five years

One mother, Leanne McLennan, shared images to Facebook of her stockpile that she has been building for five years

One mother, Leanne McLennan, shared images to Facebook of her stockpile that she has been building for five years

One mother, Leanne McLennan, shared images to Facebook of her stockpile that she has been building for five years

She has plenty of Pepsi, bottled water, juices, cans of soft drink and toilet paper as well as breakfast spread, hot chocolate, soy sauce and coconut milk 

Some social media users were impressed by Ms McLennan's set up. Some social media users were impressed by Ms McLennan's set up

Some social media users were impressed by Ms McLennan's set up. Some social media users were impressed by Ms McLennan's set up

Some social media users were impressed by Ms McLennan’s set up. Some social media users were impressed by Ms McLennan’s set up

There is every variety of bean imaginable, peas, pasta sauces, pickles, Doritos, as well as hundreds of cleaning products. 

She has plenty of Pepsi, bottled water, juices, cans of soft drink and toilet paper as well as breakfast spread, hot chocolate, soy sauce and coconut milk.

Every item has a place on the Bunnings $35 storage devices she has set up to contain the produce so she can very easily reach for whatever she needs.

Some social media users were impressed by Ms McLennan’s set up.

One said it looked as though she was preparing for the apocalypse, while others said they wish they had the space to do the same.

Ms McLennan said she has been building it in order to save money however a bonus was ‘being ready for anything that may happen’.

Professor Ian Mackay, an infectious disease specialist from the University of Queensland, said people should have up to two weeks worth of food during the coronavirus outbreak.

He said it is important to shop smartly however.

Australians are panic-buying items such as toilet paper, pasta and medication due to coronavirus

Australians are panic-buying items such as toilet paper, pasta and medication due to coronavirus

Australians are panic-buying items such as toilet paper, pasta and medication due to coronavirus

There is every variety of bean imaginable, peas, pasta sauces, pickles, Dorito chips, as well as hundreds of cleaning products for use in the shower and around the house

There is every variety of bean imaginable, peas, pasta sauces, pickles, Dorito chips, as well as hundreds of cleaning products for use in the shower and around the house

There is every variety of bean imaginable, peas, pasta sauces, pickles, Dorito chips, as well as hundreds of cleaning products for use in the shower and around the house

‘We can get in a bit of stock, foods, dried foods, dried fruits, some medicines – if you have any prescriptions it’s good to get those filled now,’ he told the ABC.

‘Just ahead of time, in case there are any disruptions to shelf stock or shelf supply – things like truck drivers getting sick.

‘We can be a little bit ahead of that curve and we’ve still got plenty of time because the virus isn’t spreading widely here yet.’ 

Ms McLennan shared her top tips in order to successfully stockpile – including always shop specials first and never collect perishables such as cereal and bread.   

‘Buy generic brands when available as they are sometimes cheaper than waiting for half price specials,’ she told Daily Mail Australia.

Some pharmacies have sold out of popular hygiene products used

Some pharmacies have sold out of popular hygiene products used

Some pharmacies have sold out of popular hygiene products used 

Supermarket shelves have been left bare following information people should have a two-week supply of food

Supermarket shelves have been left bare following information people should have a two-week supply of food

Supermarket shelves have been left bare following information people should have a two-week supply of food.

Ms McLennan shared her tops tips in order to successfully stockpile a supply of food

Ms McLennan shared her tops tips in order to successfully stockpile a supply of food

Ms McLennan shared her tops tips in order to successfully stockpile a supply of food

‘Rotate your stock. Bring the older items forward and put newer items to the back. Write use by dates on the front of perishable items and sort with first to be used at the front.’

She said she started with toiletries and filled her bathroom cupboard up before she expanded into her current space. 

Another woman has shown the lengths she has gone to in order to be prepared for the potential pandemic. 

The woman, who wished to remain anonymous, is a self-professed zombie apocalypse movie enthusiast from Scenic Rim in south-east Queensland, and has enough food and medicine to last a year.

People are questioning whether they need to start stocking up on items such as toilet paper amid coronavirus outbreak

People are questioning whether they need to start stocking up on items such as toilet paper amid coronavirus outbreak

People are questioning whether they need to start stocking up on items such as toilet paper amid coronavirus outbreak

Despite having five pantries brimming with 50kg each of rice and lentils, boxes of cereal and bottles of hand sanitiser, the mum-of-four said she doesn’t think the coronavirus will get ‘really bad’, but believes ‘you can never be too safe’.

‘We’ve gone a little above and beyond,’ she told news.com.au, detailing her new collection of water filters, camping gear, vegetable seeds, dog food, weapons and surplus of paracetamol, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications.

The 32-year-old said she initially started hoarding medicine for her son who takes medication for ADHD that is manufactured in China.

She fears that if the Chinese borders aren’t re-opened soon, her son will be without medicine.

‘If it ever did go bad, medicine would be something to trade for, for maybe food or something else. Asthma puffers, we’ve stocked up on them, because let’s face it, half of Australia has asthma.

An anonymous woman’s family have five pantries brimming with 50kg each of rice and lentils, boxes of cereal and bottles of hand sanitizer

The family have started a fish breeding program in three large tanks in their living room

The family have started a fish breeding program in three large tanks in their living room

The family have started a fish breeding program in three large tanks in their living room

‘We’ve got about 15 pouches of tobacco so far. It’s not a lot but it can still be traded for food if need be. Smokers, no matter how crazy it is, will still want to smoke.’

She has also melted silver and gold jewellery down in case a bartering system becomes the new normal and the family need something valuable to trade.

The family has also started to research survival skills and natural healing methods, and her husband is learning to blacksmith in case forging metal becomes a coveted skill in a post-apocalyptic world.

Along with a fish breeding program in three large tanks in their living room, the family have a full survival plan in case the coronavirus gets out of control in Australia.

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA CLIMB TO 42

NEW SOUTH WALES: 15 

January 25 

Three men aged 43, 53, and 35 who had recently travelled to China contracted the disease.

Two flew in from Wuhan while the other arrived in Sydney from Shenzhen, south China.

They were treated in isolation at Westmead Hospital. 

January 27  

A 21-year-old woman is identified as the fourth person to test positive for the illness in NSW.

The woman, a student at UNSW, flew into Sydney International Airport on flight MU749 on January 23 and presented to the emergency department 24 hours later after developing flu-like symptoms.

March 1 

A man in his 40s is confirmed as the fifth coronavirus case in the state and a woman in her 50s as the sixth. Both returned to Sydney from Iran. 

March 2 

The 41-year-old sister of a man who had returned from Iran with the disease was one of three confirmed cases. The second locally-acquired case was a 53-year-old male health worker who hadn’t travelled for many months.

The other new case is a 31-year-old man who flew into Sydney on Saturday from Iran and developed symptoms 24 hours later.

March 3

Six more cases are confirmed in NSW. They included a 39-year-old man who had flown in from Iran and a 53-year-old man who arrived from Singapore last Friday.

Two women aged in their 60s who arrived in Sydney from South Korea and Japan respectively were also confirmed.

A man in his 30s who returned from Malaysia to Sydney on Malindo Air flight OD171 on March 1 was also confirmed infected.   

A 50-year-old woman is diagnosed with coronavirus. The woman is a carer at a nursing home in Macquarie Park in Sydney’s north. She had not been overseas and contracted the virus in Australia. 

VICTORIA: 10

January 25  

A Chinese national aged in his 50s becomes the first confirmed case of the coronavirus in Australia.

The man flew to Melbourne on China Southern flight CZ321 from Wuhan via Guangzhou on January 19.

He was quarantined at Monash Hospital in Clayton in Melbourne’s east.

January 29   

A Victorian man in his 60s is diagnosed with the coronavirus.

He became unwell on January 23 – two days after returning from the Chinese city of Wuhan, the epicentre of the outbreak.

The man was confirmed as positive on January 29 and was subsequently seen by doctors at the Monash Medical Centre.

January 30 

 A woman in her 40s is found to have coronavirus.

She was visiting from China and mostly spent time with her family.

She is being treated at Royal Melbourne Hospital. 

February 1 

A woman in her 20s in Melbourne is found to have the virus. 

February 22

Two passengers taken off the Diamond Princess cruise ship test positive. 

February 25

Another passenger taken off the cruise ship tests positive. 

March 1

Victorian man confirmed to have coronavirus after the 78-year-old was evacuated to Melbourne from a Darwin quarantine centre.

It is confirmed a Victorian woman in her 30s has tested positive for coronavirus after flying from Malaysia to Melbourne via Indonesia.

March 4

Victorian man in his 30s confirmed to have coronavirus after returning from Iran. Health Minister Jenny Mikakos said the man was ‘almost symptom-free’ after self-isolating 

QUEENSLAND: 10

January 29

Queensland confirms its first case after a 44-year-old Chinese national was diagnosed with the virus. He is being treated at Gold Coast University Hospital.

January 30

A 42-year-old Chinese woman who was travelling in the same Wuhan tour group as the 44-year-old man tests positive. She is in Gold Coast University Hospital in stable condition.

February 4

An eight-year-old boy was diagnosed with coronavirus. He is also from the tour group where the other Queensland cases came from.

February 5

A 37-year-old man, who was a member of a group of nine Chinese tourists in quarantine on the Gold Coast, also tested positive.

February 6  

A 37-year-old woman was diagnosed with coronavirus from the same travel group that flew to Queensland from Melbourne on January 27.

February 21 

Two Queensland women, aged 54 and 55, tested positive for COVID-19 and will be flown to Brisbane for further treatment.

A 57-year-old woman from Queensland also tested positive for the virus.

February 28

A 63-year-old woman was confirmed to have the virus after returning to the Gold Coast from Iran.

March 3

A 20-year-old man from China was confirmed as the tenth person to be infected by the coronavirus in Queensland. The man had travelled to Dubai for at least 14 days before entering Australia, via Brisbane on February 23. 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA: 3

February 1  

A Chinese couple in their 60s who arrived in Adelaide from Wuhan to visit relatives are confirmed to have coronavirus.

A 24-year-old woman from South Australia was transferred to Royal Adelaide Hospital.

March 4

Mother, 40, is diagnosed after flying to Australia from Iran via Kuala Lumpur

WESTERN AUSTRALIA: 2

February 21 

A 78-year-old man from Western Australia was transferred to Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth. On February 28, he was taken into intensive care in a ‘serious’ condition and later died. 

March 1 

The elderly man died in the early hours of the morning from the virus at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital.

TASMANIA: 1  

March 2

The man who travelled from Iran to Australia on Saturday tested positive for COVID-19.

 

DailyMail Online


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