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18th century mansion designed by architect who worked on Buckingham Palace could be yours for £1.8m

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Royalty lovers can snap up their own 18th-century Welsh mansion masterpiece designed by famed architect John Nash for £1.8million – after its price was slashed by £200,000. 

Nash created blueprints for the sprawling countryside estate and began construction in 1794 – three decades before extending and transforming Buckingham Palace for King George IV. 

The 13-bed property, which is called Ffynone, was up for sale for £2million in the village of Boncath near Cardigan but is down £200,000 after being on the market for over a year.   

Royal lovers can snap up their own 18th-century Welsh mansion masterpiece designed by famed architect John Nash for £1.8million – after its price was slashed by £200,000

Nash created blueprints for the sprawling countryside estate and began construction in 1794 - three decades before extending and transforming Buckingham Palace for King George IV

Nash created blueprints for the sprawling countryside estate and began construction in 1794 - three decades before extending and transforming Buckingham Palace for King George IV

Nash created blueprints for the sprawling countryside estate and began construction in 1794 – three decades before extending and transforming Buckingham Palace for King George IV

Parts of the manor house were revamped by architect Inigo Thomas, who added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room (pictured)

Parts of the manor house were revamped by architect Inigo Thomas, who added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room (pictured)

Parts of the manor house were revamped by architect Inigo Thomas, who added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room (pictured)

Nash designed the manor house in a classical Georgian style (pictured, a living room which has elegant Georgian features)

Nash designed the manor house in a classical Georgian style (pictured, a living room which has elegant Georgian features)

Nash designed the manor house in a classical Georgian style (pictured, a living room which has elegant Georgian features)

In the library the Corinthian column area and fireplace, recorded as being made in Neath, are original Nash features

In the library the Corinthian column area and fireplace, recorded as being made in Neath, are original Nash features

In the library the Corinthian column area and fireplace, recorded as being made in Neath, are original Nash features

Renowned architect to the Regent, John Nash 

John Nash (1752-1835)

John Nash (1752-1835)

John Nash (1752-1835)

John Nash (1752-1835) was one of the foremost British architects of the Regency and Georgian eras, whose best-known solo works are Buckingham Palace, the Royal Pavilion in Brighton, and Marble Arch.

Nash’s best known collaboration with property developer James Burton is Regent Street, and his best-known collaborations with Decimus Burton are the terraces that surround Regent’s Park. 

He also re-landscaped St. James’s Park, turning a canal into the present lake that is there today.

Nash’s famous works were financed by the Prince Regent, later King George IV, after likely coming to his attention through his friend Charles James Fox, the famed Whig rival of William Pitt the Younger.

Nash created the large U-shaped front to Buckingham Palace by adding wings to the existing structure and the arch at the centre of the palace forecourt.

The project went over budget and after the King’s death in 1830 Nash was sacked from his post for spending £496,169 on the transformation.

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The manor house contains 13 bedrooms, six reception rooms, an old kitchen which still has a cast iron range and an extensive basement that still features a vaulted ceiling designed by Nash.  

The 35-acre grounds boast a coach house, stables, a granary, a clock tower and workshops, and three self-contained apartments have been used for staff accommodation and holiday lets in the past. 

According to the website British Listed Buildings, Nash designed and built the mansion between 1792 and 1799 for Colonel John Colby and was influenced by the movement of the sun during the day. 

The original house would have had the morning room located in the north east corner, the drawing room in the north west corner, the dining room in the south west corner and an anteroom in the south east corner, chasing the daylight as it moved around the house.

Upstairs most of Nash’s original planned layout survives, including fireplaces and decorative plasterwork.

During the years following Nash’s design and construction of the manor, the property has been remodelled in some areas and additional space created.

Features from Nash’s design that have survived downstairs include the main stone staircase thought to have been made in Bristol.

In the library the Corinthian column area and fireplace, recorded as being made in Neath, are original Nash features.

The mansion was initially based on a classical Georgian model by architect Nash, who lived in Wales before moving to London.

It was remodelled in the style of an Italian palazzo in the 20th century by architect Inigo Thomas, who is credited with the design of the gardens at Sandringham House, the Queen’s private residence. 

Thomas added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces.    

Thomas also planted 60,000 trees thought to have been bought from a nursery in Norwich, added a terraced garden framed by classical stone walling and balustrades and a woodland featuring a variety of species of trees and shrubs and the last remaining water features.

Inigo Thomas added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room (pictured) with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room (pictured) with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room (pictured) with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces in the 20th century 

The manor house contains 13 bedrooms, six reception rooms, an old kitchen which still has a cast iron range and an extensive basement that still features a vaulted ceiling designed by Nash

The manor house contains 13 bedrooms, six reception rooms, an old kitchen which still has a cast iron range and an extensive basement that still features a vaulted ceiling designed by Nash

The manor house contains 13 bedrooms, six reception rooms, an old kitchen which still has a cast iron range and an extensive basement that still features a vaulted ceiling designed by Nash

Features from Nash's design that have survived include the main stone staircase thought to have been made in Bristol

Features from Nash's design that have survived include the main stone staircase thought to have been made in Bristol

Features from Nash’s design that have survived include the main stone staircase thought to have been made in Bristol

One of the 18th-century Welsh manor house's bathrooms features a mural of the house behind the roll-top bath

One of the 18th-century Welsh manor house's bathrooms features a mural of the house behind the roll-top bath

One of the 18th-century Welsh manor house’s bathrooms features a mural of the house behind the roll-top bath

Upstairs most of Nash's original planned layout survives, including fireplaces and decorative plasterwork

Upstairs most of Nash's original planned layout survives, including fireplaces and decorative plasterwork

Upstairs most of Nash’s original planned layout survives, including fireplaces and decorative plasterwork

Inigo Thomas added two new wings, a dining room (pictured), a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas added two new wings, a dining room (pictured), a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas added two new wings, a dining room (pictured), a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas added two new wings, a dining room, a ballroom constructed in a classic Italian Baroque style, a library and a music room with a cross-vaulted roof and terraces in the 20th century

Estate agents Savills said: ‘Ffynone is a magnificent Grade I-listed mansion designed by the renowned architect John Nash. Nash is most famous for the eponymous terraces that surround London’s Regents Park.

‘Nash also spent a number of years working in Wales where Ffynone is widely considered to be his finest private work across the border, which he completed in 1799.’

The current owners bought the house in 1988 and have spent 30 years restoring its former glory.

The 13-bed property, which is called Ffynone, was up for sale for £2million in the village of Boncath near Cardigan but is down £200,000 after being on the market for over a year

The 13-bed property, which is called Ffynone, was up for sale for £2million in the village of Boncath near Cardigan but is down £200,000 after being on the market for over a year

The 13-bed property, which is called Ffynone, was up for sale for £2million in the village of Boncath near Cardigan but is down £200,000 after being on the market for over a year 

Inigo Thomas added a terraced garden framed by classical stone walling and balustrades and a woodland featuring a variety of species of trees and shrubs and the last remaining water features in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas added a terraced garden framed by classical stone walling and balustrades and a woodland featuring a variety of species of trees and shrubs and the last remaining water features in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas added a terraced garden framed by classical stone walling and balustrades and a woodland featuring a variety of species of trees and shrubs and the last remaining water features in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas also planted 60,000 trees thought to have been bought from a nursery in Norwich in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas also planted 60,000 trees thought to have been bought from a nursery in Norwich in the 20th century

Inigo Thomas also planted 60,000 trees thought to have been bought from a nursery in Norwich in the 20th century

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