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The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation hosted the first Operation Flashpoint event Wednesday in Clinton. Operation Flashpoint is an initiative that urges both the public and businesses to be aware of suspicious activity in stores.Bombs can be made with simple and common household items. Both the chemicals and components used to build explosive devices can be bought in the average convenience store, federal authorities said. Some of the items include mouse traps, clothespins and chlorine, authorities said.Revell Ace Hardware housed the event at their Clinton location and are working with both CISA and the FBI to bring public awareness to the possible issue. The goal of the 90-day program is to encourage both businesses and the community to voluntarily report suspicious activity. They’re asked to report anyone who is buying large amounts of a combination of certain chemicals and materials. CISA officials said there is no direct threat in the metro area right now, and the program is intended to prevent any future possibilities. “This is the start to a national program to make sure that DVE threats stay in our radar screen so that we can proactively and preventively respond whenever threats change,” said Dr. David Mussington, DHS and CISA executive assistant director for infrastructure security.Suspicious activity can be reported by calling 855-835-5324.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation hosted the first Operation Flashpoint event Wednesday in Clinton.

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Operation Flashpoint is an initiative that urges both the public and businesses to be aware of suspicious activity in stores.

Bombs can be made with simple and common household items. Both the chemicals and components used to build explosive devices can be bought in the average convenience store, federal authorities said. Some of the items include mouse traps, clothespins and chlorine, authorities said.

Revell Ace Hardware housed the event at their Clinton location and are working with both CISA and the FBI to bring public awareness to the possible issue.

The goal of the 90-day program is to encourage both businesses and the community to voluntarily report suspicious activity. They’re asked to report anyone who is buying large amounts of a combination of certain chemicals and materials.

CISA officials said there is no direct threat in the metro area right now, and the program is intended to prevent any future possibilities.

“This is the start to a national program to make sure that DVE threats stay in our radar screen so that we can proactively and preventively respond whenever threats change,” said Dr. David Mussington, DHS and CISA executive assistant director for infrastructure security.

Suspicious activity can be reported by calling 855-835-5324.

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