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In the eyes of purists, it was bad enough that David Baddiel put the cream on his scone before the jam. 

But then the comedian, pictured, went on to compound his error by using cranberry sauce instead of the usual strawberry or raspberry jam. 

Sharing a picture of his creation on Instagram, Baddiel, 57, said: ‘A lack of jam in the house I’m staying in means I’m having a scone with cranberry sauce. So sue me.’ 

What probably triggered the most controversy on social media was Baddiel's use of cranberry sauce on his scone (pictured)  instead of strawberry or raspberry jam

What probably triggered the most controversy on social media was Baddiel's use of cranberry sauce on his scone (pictured)  instead of strawberry or raspberry jam

What probably triggered the most controversy on social media was Baddiel’s use of cranberry sauce on his scone (pictured)  instead of strawberry or raspberry jam

Putting the cream on first would have upset lovers of the Cornish cream tea, though in the neighbouring county it is the way to create a Devon cream tea. 

The debate about which is the correct way round has endured for decades.

But what probably triggered the most controversy on social media was his use of cranberry sauce.

One critic, Allan Wright, said: ‘Welcome to 2022, just when you thought it couldn’t get any madder…’ 

Another added: ‘So wrong on so many levels…’ 

But others praised Baddiel’s concoction as ‘delicious, inventive and classy’.

The debate is just the latest shot fired in the long and hotly contested cream tea conflict.

But others praised David Baddiel¿s concoction as ¿delicious, inventive and classy'

But others praised David Baddiel¿s concoction as ¿delicious, inventive and classy'

But others praised David Baddiel’s concoction as ‘delicious, inventive and classy’

In 2010 campaigners from Devon applied to have the ‘Devon cream tea’ given Protected Designation of Origin under EU law.

The move sparked a row with Cornwall about which county first invented the traditional afternoon combination of tea, scones, clotted cream and jam.

In 2018 the National Trust angered its Cornish supporters by promoting a Mother’s Day cream tea at a Cornish property with a picture of a scone with cream spread beneath the jam – the Devon way.

In a statement Lanhydrock House and Garden apologised for ‘any offence caused’ by the photo.

A spokesman added: ‘We’d like to reassure our Cornish community that our catering team would never make such a heinous mistake and that our jam and cream are usually served in little pots so the order of their application is not subject to such appalling error. Rest assured, your mothers are safe here.’

Source: Daily Mail UK

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