Share

SpaceX founder and multibillionaire Elon Musk has promised to donate $50 million to SpaceX’s Inspiration4 fundraiser for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.   

On Saturday, the Inspiration4 crew shared new pictures on Twitter showing Jared Isaacman, Hayley Arceneaux, Sian Proctor and Chris Sembroski after their capsule parachuted into the Atlantic Ocean just before sunset.  

‘#Inspiration4’s mission doesn’t end here — help us reach our $200 million fundraising goal for @StJude,’  the tweet read.

Musk responded shortly, writing: ‘Count me in for $50M.’   

SpaceX founder and multibillionaire Elon Musk (pictured) has promised to donate $50 million to SpaceX's Inspiration4 fundraiser for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

SpaceX founder and multibillionaire Elon Musk (pictured) has promised to donate $50 million to SpaceX's Inspiration4 fundraiser for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

SpaceX founder and multibillionaire Elon Musk (pictured) has promised to donate $50 million to SpaceX’s Inspiration4 fundraiser for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Musk paid undisclosed millions for the trip to show that ordinary people could blast into orbit by themselves, and were the first to orbit Earth without a professional astronaut.

Musk paid undisclosed millions for the trip to show that ordinary people could blast into orbit by themselves, and were the first to orbit Earth without a professional astronaut.

Musk paid undisclosed millions for the trip to show that ordinary people could blast into orbit by themselves, and were the first to orbit Earth without a professional astronaut. 

The all-amateur crew that encompassed Inspiration4 was created primarily to raise awareness and support for the pediatric cancer center, which successfully treated Arceneaux for bone cancer when she was a child.  

Musk paid undisclosed millions for the trip to show that ordinary people could blast into orbit by themselves, and were the first to orbit Earth without a professional astronaut. 

Isaacman, 38, an entrepreneur and accomplished pilot, aimed to raise $200 million for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and donated $100 million himself.

Joining him on the flight were Arceneaux, 29, a St. Jude physician assistant who was treated at the Memphis, Tennessee hospital for bone cancer, and contest winners Chris Sembroski, 42, a data engineer in Everett, Washington, and Sian Proctor, 51, a college educator, scientist and artist from Tempe, Arizona.

The all-amateur crew that encompassed Inspiration4 was created primarily to raise awareness and support for the pediatric cancer center of the hospital

The all-amateur crew that encompassed Inspiration4 was created primarily to raise awareness and support for the pediatric cancer center of the hospital

The all-amateur crew that encompassed Inspiration4 was created primarily to raise awareness and support for the pediatric cancer center of the hospital

On Saturday, the Inspiration4 crew completed their mission after Jared Isaacman, Hayley Arceneaux, Sian Proctor and Chris Sembroski's papsule parachuted into the Atlantic Ocean just before sunset.

On Saturday, the Inspiration4 crew completed their mission after Jared Isaacman, Hayley Arceneaux, Sian Proctor and Chris Sembroski's papsule parachuted into the Atlantic Ocean just before sunset.

On Saturday, the Inspiration4 crew completed their mission after Jared Isaacman, Hayley Arceneaux, Sian Proctor and Chris Sembroski’s papsule parachuted into the Atlantic Ocean just before sunset. 

The Inspiraitonal4's capsule is retrieved from the Atlantic Ocean Saturday off the coast of Florida

The Inspiraitonal4's capsule is retrieved from the Atlantic Ocean Saturday off the coast of Florida

The Inspiraitonal4’s capsule is retrieved from the Atlantic Ocean Saturday off the coast of Florida 

For the last seat, Isaacman held a competition for clients of his Allentown, Pennsylvania payment-processing business, Shift4 Payments.

‘Best ride of my life!’ Proctor tweeted a few hours after splashdown.

Strangers until March, the four spent six months training and preparing for potential emergencies during the flight – but there was no need to step in, officials said after their return. 

During the trip dubbed Inspiration4, the crew had time to chat with St. Jude patients, conduct medical tests on themselves, ring the closing bell for the New York Stock Exchange and do some drawing and ukulele playing.    

SpaceX´s fully automated Dragon capsule reached an unusually high altitude of 363 miles after Wednesday night’s liftoff. 

Surpassing the International Space Station by 100 miles, the passengers savored views of Earth through a big bubble-shaped window added to the top of the capsule.

The four streaked back through the atmosphere early Saturday evening, the first space travelers to end their flight in the Atlantic since Apollo 9 in 1969. SpaceX´s two previous crew splashdowns – carrying astronauts for NASA – were in the Gulf of Mexico.

Chris Sembroski, one of four passengers aboard the SpaceX capsule, reacts after emerging from the capsule Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021, after it was recovered following its splashdown in the Atlantic off the Florida coast.

Chris Sembroski, one of four passengers aboard the SpaceX capsule, reacts after emerging from the capsule Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021, after it was recovered following its splashdown in the Atlantic off the Florida coast.

Chris Sembroski, one of four passengers aboard the SpaceX capsule, reacts after emerging from the capsule Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021, after it was recovered following its splashdown in the Atlantic off the Florida coast.

SpaceX passengers aboard a SpaceX capsule react as the capsule parachutes into the Atlantic Ocean off the Florida coast, Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021.

SpaceX passengers aboard a SpaceX capsule react as the capsule parachutes into the Atlantic Ocean off the Florida coast, Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021.

SpaceX passengers aboard a SpaceX capsule react as the capsule parachutes into the Atlantic Ocean off the Florida coast, Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021.

Within a few minutes, a pair of SpaceX boats pulled up alongside the bobbing capsule. When the capsule’s hatch was opened on the recovery ship, Arceneaux was the first one out, flashing a big smile and thumbs up.  

Aside from trouble with a toilet fan and a bad temperature sensor in an engine, the flight went exceedingly well, officials said. Some of the four passengers experienced motion sickness when they reached orbit – just as some astronauts do.

‘It was a very clean mission from start to finish,’ said Benji Reed, a SpaceX senior director.

Reed anticipates as many as six private flights a year for SpaceX, sandwiched between astronaut launches for NASA. Four SpaceX flights are already booked to carry paying customers to the space station, accompanied by former NASA astronauts. 

The first is targeted for early next year with three businessmen paying $55 million apiece. Russia also plans to take up an actor and film director for filming next month and a Japanese tycoon in December. 

Source: Daily Mail UK

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *