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“We got a pandemic with COVID-19, but we got an epidemic with our kids dying,” Darryl King Sr. said. King is not just reading the headlines about the violence that’s left six people dead in four days in the metro. For him, the pain is all too familiar. “I lost a son, Darryl Jr. Can you imagine how devastating that is?” he said. It was an argument at a basketball court in Iroquois Park in April of 2019 when 26-year-old Darryl King Jr. was shot and killed, but his dad wants to use another park as a venue to save lives. “Back in the day in the parks, we used to have family reunions. We use to have revivals, we use to have picnics. When’s the last time you heard, ‘Let’s take the whole family, let’s take the community on a picnic,'” Darryl King Sr. said. King wants to bring the community together at Shawnee park to talk about the problems and solutions. He knows it’s a big job, but he feels he has been called to do it. “Since the day we talked Thursday and this Monday, what, five, six killings? So where do you grieve at? Where do you get the break at? I take it back to my son. April the 4th of 2019. Go do the numbers every year. We done increased,” he said Dr. Stephen Taylor of the University of Louisville Peace Hospital says there can be serious mental health issues associated with not properly dealing with the ongoing violence in our community.”If there is violence in our community, it should outrage all of us. If a child is killed, we should all be enraged and outraged at that,” Taylor said. And the outrage and grief can hit everyone hard, especially children. He says the bottom line is we must all work together.”We can’t just leave it to a neighborhood to solve it for themselves. The problem has to be my problem. It has to be everybody’s problem,” he said. As for King, he said he will not stop until he meets with the leaders of the city to bring everyone together and stop the pain someone else will feel when they get that call that their child is gone.

“We got a pandemic with COVID-19, but we got an epidemic with our kids dying,” Darryl King Sr. said.

King is not just reading the headlines about the violence that’s left six people dead in four days in the metro. For him, the pain is all too familiar.

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“I lost a son, Darryl Jr. Can you imagine how devastating that is?” he said.

It was an argument at a basketball court in Iroquois Park in April of 2019 when 26-year-old Darryl King Jr. was shot and killed, but his dad wants to use another park as a venue to save lives.

“Back in the day in the parks, we used to have family reunions. We use to have revivals, we use to have picnics. When’s the last time you heard, ‘Let’s take the whole family, let’s take the community on a picnic,'” Darryl King Sr. said.

King wants to bring the community together at Shawnee park to talk about the problems and solutions.

He knows it’s a big job, but he feels he has been called to do it.

“Since the day we talked Thursday and this Monday, what, five, six killings? So where do you grieve at? Where do you get the break at? I take it back to my son. April the 4th of 2019. Go do the numbers every year. We done increased,” he said

Dr. Stephen Taylor of the University of Louisville Peace Hospital says there can be serious mental health issues associated with not properly dealing with the ongoing violence in our community.

“If there is violence in our community, it should outrage all of us. If a child is killed, we should all be enraged and outraged at that,” Taylor said.

And the outrage and grief can hit everyone hard, especially children.

He says the bottom line is we must all work together.

“We can’t just leave it to a neighborhood to solve it for themselves. The problem has to be my problem. It has to be everybody’s problem,” he said.

As for King, he said he will not stop until he meets with the leaders of the city to bring everyone together and stop the pain someone else will feel when they get that call that their child is gone.

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