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Harry and Meghan are planning for Lilibet to be christened at Windsor in front of the Queen, royal sources have told Richard Eden.

They’ve accused the Queen of handing down ‘genetic pain and suffering’ and charged unnamed relations with racism, but the Duke and Duchess of Sussex are apparently eager to cling on to the perks of life in the Royal Family.

A royal source said Prince Harry and Meghan want a royal christening for their baby, Lilibet, held in the presence of the Queen.

The California-based couple’s intentions are said to have been made clear during Harry’s visit to this country for the unveiling of Princess Diana‘s statue earlier this month.

‘Harry told several people that they want to have Lili christened at Windsor, just like her brother,’ a royal source tells Eden Confidential. 

‘They are happy to wait until circumstances allow.’

They've accused the Queen of handing down 'genetic pain and suffering' and charged unnamed relations with racism, but the Duke and Duchess of Sussex are apparently eager to cling on to the perks of life in the Royal Family

They've accused the Queen of handing down 'genetic pain and suffering' and charged unnamed relations with racism, but the Duke and Duchess of Sussex are apparently eager to cling on to the perks of life in the Royal Family

They’ve accused the Queen of handing down ‘genetic pain and suffering’ and charged unnamed relations with racism, but the Duke and Duchess of Sussex are apparently eager to cling on to the perks of life in the Royal Family

A view of the Quire in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. Lili's brother, Archie, was christened by the Archbishop amid unprecedented secrecy at the chapel in 2019.

A view of the Quire in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. Lili's brother, Archie, was christened by the Archbishop amid unprecedented secrecy at the chapel in 2019.

A view of the Quire in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle. Lili’s brother, Archie, was christened by the Archbishop amid unprecedented secrecy at the chapel in 2019.

St George's chapel is pictured in October 2018 before wedding of Princess Eugenie of York to Jack Brooksbank

St George's chapel is pictured in October 2018 before wedding of Princess Eugenie of York to Jack Brooksbank

St George’s chapel is pictured in October 2018 before wedding of Princess Eugenie of York to Jack Brooksbank

It would be Meghan’s first visit to Britain since the couple quit royal duties last year.

Interestingly, six weeks after Lili’s birth, she has not yet been given the eighth place in the line of succession that she is due, according to the official royal website. 

It’s understood that the list will not be updated until after the christening. Lili would bump the Queen’s second son, Prince Andrew, into ninth place.

Lili will join the list as long as she is not baptised a Roman Catholic, as they are specifically excluded from succession to the throne. 

Although Meghan attended a Catholic high school, she was baptised and confirmed into the Church of England in a private ceremony at the Chapel Royal conducted by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby.

The intimate 45-minute service was conducted by the Archbishop of Canterbury at the Chapel Royal in 2018 and was a closely-guarded secret with only a handful of royal aides involved.

Meghan followed partly in the footsteps of the Duchess of Cambridge, who was baptised as an infant but had a private confirmation after her engagement to Prince William.  

The service observed the full ritual of the Church with holy water from the River Jordan from the private Royal Family font poured on Meghan’s head. 

Lili’s brother, Archie, was christened by the Archbishop amid unprecedented secrecy at St George’s Chapel, Windsor, in 2019.  

The 25 invited guests – which did not include the Queen – arrived discreetly on the day through a back entrance to the grounds. 

Although details of royal babies’ godparents have always been made public in the past, Harry and Meghan refused to confirm any names. 

Godparents of royal babies are traditionally announced beforehand – often on the morning of the christening – and conventionally elderly or foreign relatives were selected. 

I hear that Prince Harry and Meghan want a royal christening for their baby, Lilibet, held in the presence of the Queen. Pictured: The Queen, Prince Philip and Meghan's mother Doria with baby Archie and his parents in 2019

I hear that Prince Harry and Meghan want a royal christening for their baby, Lilibet, held in the presence of the Queen. Pictured: The Queen, Prince Philip and Meghan's mother Doria with baby Archie and his parents in 2019

I hear that Prince Harry and Meghan want a royal christening for their baby, Lilibet, held in the presence of the Queen. Pictured: The Queen, Prince Philip and Meghan’s mother Doria with baby Archie and his parents in 2019

The couple faced significant backlash over their insistence that the 25-person ceremony would remain private and the identities of Archie’s godparents would not be revealed at the time. 

The Dean of Chelmsford, Nicholas Henshall, previously told the BBC: ‘Baptism should never be private. It’s a public demonstration of God’s love.’

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge allowed the media to cover each of their children’s christenings, as well as releasing family photographs afterwards.

It’s not clear how enthusiastic the Royal Family will be. 

Her parents have already caused one major royal row after their spokesmen claimed to U.S. media that they’d asked the Queen’s permission to use her pet name, Lilibet.

Palace sources subsequently told the BBC that no such permission had been sought.

St George’s Chapel was built by successive monarchs starting with Edward IV in 1475 and completed by Henry VIII in 1528. 

Source: Daily Mail UK

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