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A high-flying city executive who was found dead in the garden of his £2.7million home took his own life after his work stress became so severe that he was treated by paramedics, an inquest heard today.

Roddy Thomson, 40, from Liphook, West Sussex, had risen through the ranks to become Chief Operating Officer of investment giant M&G.

But in the weeks before his death, the stresses of his job had become so severe that he had to be treated by paramedics after an anxiety attack, the hearing at West Sussex Coroner’s Court heard on Tuesday.

Coroner Sarah Clarke was told that the father-of-two, who had previously been a leader at Prudential and Openreach, was diagnosed as having had an anxiety attack.

After working with a specialist, Mr Thomson had put together a plan about how to manage his stress levels, but he was found dead on April 27.

Mr Thomson’s wife Emma found him in the garden of their £2.7million home at around 5.30am.

Roddy Thomson (pictured), 40, from Liphook, had risen through the ranks to become Chief Operating Officer of M&G while maintaining his family life with his wife and two children

Roddy Thomson (pictured), 40, from Liphook, had risen through the ranks to become Chief Operating Officer of M&G while maintaining his family life with his wife and two children

Roddy Thomson (pictured), 40, from Liphook, had risen through the ranks to become Chief Operating Officer of M&G while maintaining his family life with his wife and two children

Mr Thomson had spent the evening before having dinner with his family and watching television before he went to bed ‘as normal’, Coroner’s Officer Melanie Doyle told the hearing.

His wife then noticed her husband getting out of bed at around 2.30am and he told her he was going to get a drink.

But when Mrs Thomson woke up again at 5.30am and noticed that her husband was still not in bed, she went to look for him and found him behind the shed in their garden.

Mr Thomson was confirmed dead at 6.14am on April 27 and no suicide notes were found, Ms Doyle told the inquest.

A post-mortem examination carried out by Dr Tijjani Umar concluded that Mr Thomson had died due to severe blood loss.

A toxicological examination found no drugs or alcohol in the investment executive’s blood.

Mr Thomson (pictured) put together a plan about how to manage his stress levels, but he was found dead in the garden of his £2.7million home at around 5.30am on April 27

Mr Thomson (pictured) put together a plan about how to manage his stress levels, but he was found dead in the garden of his £2.7million home at around 5.30am on April 27

Mr Thomson (pictured) put together a plan about how to manage his stress levels, but he was found dead in the garden of his £2.7million home at around 5.30am on April 27

Ms Doyle told the hearing that Mr Thomson was an ‘upbeat’ family man who was a keen golf player and loved spending time with his friends and his two sons.

She continued: ‘He was upbeat and had a positive outlook on life as well as a fun sense of humour. 

‘He was very driven and always worked hard. However, he became very stressed with work and his sleep was affected.

‘He visited his GP who prescribed him sleeping tablets and spoke to about Every Mind Matters, an NHS mental health programme.’  

Ms Clarke recorded a verdict of suicide at the inquest, concluding that it was a ‘deliberate act’ and Mr Thomson had ‘intended to end his life’.

She said: ‘To reach a conclusion of suicide I have to conclude that this was a deliberate act by Mr Thomson and that he intended to end his life and whether there was any other explanation for that act.

‘The circumstances that have been relayed to me lead me to find on the balance of probabilities that this was a deliberate act by Mr Thomson and that he did intend to end his life and importantly I find no other explanation for that act.

‘I therefore record a verdict of suicide and I extend my condolences to Mr Thomson’s family and friends.’

Coroner's Officer Melanie Doyle told the hearing that Mr Thomson (pictured) was an 'upbeat' man who was a keen golf player and loved spending time with his friends and his two sons

Coroner's Officer Melanie Doyle told the hearing that Mr Thomson (pictured) was an 'upbeat' man who was a keen golf player and loved spending time with his friends and his two sons

Coroner’s Officer Melanie Doyle told the hearing that Mr Thomson (pictured) was an ‘upbeat’ man who was a keen golf player and loved spending time with his friends and his two sons

At the time of his death, an M&G spokesman said: ‘Roddy was a great colleague and will be greatly missed. Our thoughts and sympathies are with his family at this difficult time.’

The Unite Union section for Prudential staff, where Mr Thomson had previously worked, added: ‘We are deeply shocked and saddened at the news that Roddy Thomson has passed away.

‘Whilst inevitably, we could not always agree on things, we felt that Roddy genuinely cared about colleagues and most importantly, listened to us. 

‘Roddy was incredibly approachable and would always take time out to have a chat.

‘Our thoughts are with his family, friends and colleagues at this extremely difficult time.’ 

For confidential support, call the Samaritans on 116123, or go to www.samaritans.org.

Source: Daily Mail UK

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