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Robbie Williams’ 11-year bid to sell the country mansion he bought for £8.1million is being hampered by fears that buyers are being put off by a nearby landfill site, MailOnline can reveal.

The singer has priced the historic house at £6.75m – £1.35m less than he paid in 2009, despite average UK property prices having gone up by 65 per cent. 

Williams, 47, has repeatedly tried to sell his palatial seven bedroom home set in 71 acres since buying it, but has so far been unable to find a buyer.

Local villagers believe one of the main reasons for it failing to sell is the proximity of the landfill site which is half a mile away and can be seen from some of its upstairs windows.

Exclusive pictures obtained by MailOnline show how heaps of stinking rubbish collected from homes and businesses are clearly visible from Williams’ home. 

Photographs taken just half a mile away from Robbie Williams' Wiltshire mansion this week show a digger driver shovelling bags of waste into huge piles as hungry seagulls fly overhead near Compton Bassett, near Calne

Photographs taken just half a mile away from Robbie Williams' Wiltshire mansion this week show a digger driver shovelling bags of waste into huge piles as hungry seagulls fly overhead near Compton Bassett, near Calne

Photographs taken just half a mile away from Robbie Williams’ Wiltshire mansion this week show a digger driver shovelling bags of waste into huge piles as hungry seagulls fly overhead near Compton Bassett, near Calne

The landfill site (circled right) is almost completely hidden from the fully restored 18th century property during the summer months when nearby trees are in full leaf.

The landfill site (circled right) is almost completely hidden from the fully restored 18th century property during the summer months when nearby trees are in full leaf.

The landfill site (circled right) is almost completely hidden from the fully restored 18th century property (circled left) during the summer months when nearby trees are in full leaf

A view from above landfill site shows Williams' mansion (circled in red) sits just across a field less than a mile away

A view from above landfill site shows Williams' mansion (circled in red) sits just across a field less than a mile away

A view from above landfill site shows Williams’ mansion (circled in red) sits just across a field less than a mile away 

Local villagers believe one of the main reasons for the sprawling pad (pictured) failing to sell is the proximity of the landfill site which can be seen from some of its upstairs windows - and which can 'hum' in the summer months

Local villagers believe one of the main reasons for the sprawling pad (pictured) failing to sell is the proximity of the landfill site which can be seen from some of its upstairs windows - and which can 'hum' in the summer months

Local villagers believe one of the main reasons for the sprawling pad (pictured) failing to sell is the proximity of the landfill site which can be seen from some of its upstairs windows – and which can ‘hum’ in the summer months

Williams would have known about the presence of the rubbish dump when he bought the house which was formerly owned by architect Lord Foster (Pictured: Williams with wife Ayda at London event in 2019)

Williams would have known about the presence of the rubbish dump when he bought the house which was formerly owned by architect Lord Foster (Pictured: Williams with wife Ayda at London event in 2019)

Williams would have known about the presence of the rubbish dump when he bought the house which was formerly owned by architect Lord Foster (Pictured: Williams with wife Ayda at London event in 2019) 

The landfill site covering 4.8acres has been legally operated by Hills Waste Solutions since the early 1990s. It was previously a council run site. 

The site has met all environmental standards and has a contract with Wiltshire County council to dispose of household waste for a wide area, including the towns of Calne, Wooton Basset and other smaller villages. 

It is almost completely hidden from the fully restored 18th century property during the summer months when nearby trees are in full leaf.

But there is nothing to cut off views of the unsightly dump from the side of the house after the leaves start to fall in Autumn.

The photographs taken this week show a digger driver shovelling bags of waste into huge piles as hungry seagulls fly overhead near Compton Bassett, near Calne, Wiltshire.

Local residents have previously complained about smells from the site wafting across the open countryside before the rubbish can be buried under mounds of earth.

One villager said: ‘Why would you pay millions for somewhere where you look out on a rubbish tip. If you have that much money to spend you want the most perfect views’

Another local added: ‘There is no escaping the fact that there is a huge rubbish dump very close to the property.

‘The smell is not that bad in the winter months, but it can hum a bit in the hot summers. It depends on which way the wind is blowing.

‘Any wealthy person, and you have to be seriously rich to maintain the house, does not want to get stuck behind a refuse truck that are constantly arriving at the site.’

Residents in the village said the former Take That singer and his family had not lived full time at the sprawling estate for several years.

Williams and his wife Ayda and four children are instead believed to spend most of their time at his £24m estate overlooking Lake Geneva in Switzerland.

Sweeping: The property is located close to the quaint village of Compton Bassett in Wiltshire

Sweeping: The property is located close to the quaint village of Compton Bassett in Wiltshire

Sweeping: The property is located close to the quaint village of Compton Bassett in Wiltshire

60s meets modern: There are five reception rooms and an indoor pool, a gym, a steam room, and a billiards room

60s meets modern: There are five reception rooms and an indoor pool, a gym, a steam room, and a billiards room

60s meets modern: There are five reception rooms and an indoor pool, a gym, a steam room, and a billiards room

Niche: The décor and accents are a clear nod to their eccentric owners

Niche: The décor and accents are a clear nod to their eccentric owners

Niche: The décor and accents are a clear nod to their eccentric owners

Tranquil: The property boasts its own parkland and woods, as well as a football pitch, on which soccer-mad Robbie will have no doubt enjoyed honing his ball skills

Tranquil: The property boasts its own parkland and woods, as well as a football pitch, on which soccer-mad Robbie will have no doubt enjoyed honing his ball skills

Tranquil: The property boasts its own parkland and woods, as well as a football pitch, on which soccer-mad Robbie will have no doubt enjoyed honing his ball skills

The singer’s property portfolio also includes a Beverley Hills mansion and a £17m home in Notting Hill, West London.

Williams tried in vain to sell his Wiltshire house in 2010 and again in 2015 when he slashed £1m from the asking price.

Obnoxious smells like rotten eggs drifting from the landfill site were blamed for putting off potential buyers when it went on the market for a second time.

The singer would have known about the presence of the rubbish dump when he bought the house which was formerly owned by architect Lord Foster.

But he shrugged off any concerns after apparently falling in love with the property which has a helicopter hangar and formal gardens with a temples and fountains.

It was revealed at the time that the house also had a basement swimming pool approached by a lobby with black and white flooring inspired by the decor of the residence of Pierce Brosnan in The Thomas Crown Affair.

The house was originally built as a giant stabling block for horses kept by the owners of a nearby country house built in 1674.

But it was converted into a home after the main house was demolished in 1929, and underwent massive renovation under previous owners in 1998.

The work on the property was so extensive that a new electricity substation reportedly had to be installed at a cost of £350,000 as it was using so much energy.

Williams is said to have carried out further improvements, adding a cinema room, football pitch and a quad bike track.

The singer, who is worth an estimated £80m, once described the house as an ‘impulse’ buy, saying he thought it was an ideal place to bring up his family.

He talked of his affection for the property, saying it was where he an Ayda ‘truly fell in love’.

Williams praised it as family-friendly and said it was perfect for the couple’s children – Theodora, nine, Charlton, six, Colette, three, and 21-month-old son Beau.

An estate manager and security staff are currently the only people at the rambling period property. They are known to occasionally pop into the local pub The White Horse.

Hills Waste Solutions blamed smells from the site several years ago on gases seeping from the buried refuse, and installed industrial sprays similar to air fresheners to tackle the problem.

It is believed that the smells emerged after heavy winter rainfall drenched rubbish that had not yet been covered with earth, leading to more gases being released as the waste and water mixture decomposed after being buried.

One resident, who logged complaints with the waste contractors through the parish council, said that the stink could affect those living in neighbouring villages.

He said: ‘It causes people to close their windows. Residents have got fed up with complaining as they can’t see how it’s going to end. It’s depressing.

‘The stench is more obnoxious than rotten eggs and will definitely affect house prices. There’s a few bed and breakfasts and it could affect their businesses as nobody wants to stay in a place with a pong.’

Peter Szczesiak, chairman of the Compton Bassett Parish Council, said the landfill site had been present since he moved to the village in 1977.

He added: ‘Back then it was a council run site and it has expanded but not in recent years.

‘There have been no recent complaints about any smells from the site. I have no idea why Mr Williams home has not sold.’

But other locals remain convinced that the landfill site will be a deterrent to potential buyers of Williams’ home.

Residents on a former military housing estate said they could smell the dump in the summer.

A former soldier living about a mile from the site, said: ‘It does get a bit strong now and then.

‘Some people might be put off having a landfill so close, but there could be other reasons it hasn’t sold.’

Estate agents Knight Frank recently listed the house for £6.75m, describing the asking price as ‘realistic’.

The proximity of the landfill site is not mentioned by the agents tasked with selling the home which includes two staff flats and a detached cottage.

Obnoxious smells like rotten eggs drifting from the landfill site (pictured) were blamed for putting off potential buyers when Williams' mansion went on the market for a second time

Obnoxious smells like rotten eggs drifting from the landfill site (pictured) were blamed for putting off potential buyers when Williams' mansion went on the market for a second time

Obnoxious smells like rotten eggs drifting from the landfill site (pictured) were blamed for putting off potential buyers when Williams’ mansion went on the market for a second time

The singer would have known about the presence of the rubbish dump (pictured) when he bought the house which was formerly owned by architect Lord Foster

The singer would have known about the presence of the rubbish dump (pictured) when he bought the house which was formerly owned by architect Lord Foster

The singer would have known about the presence of the rubbish dump (pictured) when he bought the house which was formerly owned by architect Lord Foster

Landfill site operator Hills Waste Solutions blamed smells from the site several years ago on gases seeping from the buried refuse, and installed industrial sprays similar to air fresheners to tackle the problem

Landfill site operator Hills Waste Solutions blamed smells from the site several years ago on gases seeping from the buried refuse, and installed industrial sprays similar to air fresheners to tackle the problem

Landfill site operator Hills Waste Solutions blamed smells from the site several years ago on gases seeping from the buried refuse, and installed industrial sprays similar to air fresheners to tackle the problem

Peter Szczesiak, chairman of the Compton Bassett Parish Council, said the landfill site (pictured) had been present since he moved to the village in 1977

Peter Szczesiak, chairman of the Compton Bassett Parish Council, said the landfill site (pictured) had been present since he moved to the village in 1977

Peter Szczesiak, chairman of the Compton Bassett Parish Council, said the landfill site (pictured) had been present since he moved to the village in 1977

They describe it as ‘a remarkable period house, recently restored to an exemplary standard with superb indoor pool and magical gardens.’

The property details say the house is ‘approached via a sweeping drive through attractive parkland’ and is ‘an exceptional country house nestled within its own land’.

The details add: ‘The leisure complex is of an exceptional standard, with a gym, indoor swimming pool extending to over 73ft in length, hot tub, steam room, sauna and changing rooms

‘Outside there is integrated garaging, helicopter hangar and workshop. The immaculate gardens and grounds include a walled garden with pavilion, water feature and tennis court. There is a grass football pitch, paddocks and woodland.’

Refuse trucks carrying rubbish to the landfill site from nearby towns do not drive along the narrow country road leading to Williams’ home.

Instead, they use the main road through Calne. Signs at the site also warn drivers about the direction they should travel when leaving.

Source: Daily Mail UK

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