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A second walrus has been spotted off the coast of Britain just a month after Wally returned to the Artic.

The huge mammal was seen sleeping off the shore at Seahouses village in Northumberland this morning.  

It is unclear how the creature ended up in the North East as they usually reside hundreds of miles away towards the Arctic Sea.

A second walrus has been spotted off the coast of Britain just a month after Wally returned to the Artic

A second walrus has been spotted off the coast of Britain just a month after Wally returned to the Artic

A second walrus has been spotted off the coast of Britain just a month after Wally returned to the Artic

The huge mammal was seen sleeping off the shore at Seahouses in Northumberland this morning

The huge mammal was seen sleeping off the shore at Seahouses in Northumberland this morning

The huge mammal was seen sleeping off the shore at Seahouses in Northumberland this morning

It comes just a month after the world’s most famous walrus was spotted alive and well in Iceland, almost a month since he was last seen off Ireland’s southwesterly coast.

The wandering walrus captured the imagination of wildlife lovers around the world with his European travels this summer, which included stops in France, Spain and the Isles of Scilly.

The four-year-old whiskery gentleman started out on his tour in March, and when he fancied a pit-stop, he’d haul his 800kg bulk onto the nearest motorboat and take a nap – sometimes for several days.

But there were concerns Wally had died after 22 days without any confirmed sightings of the marine mammal and a carcass washed up on the North Devon coast, after scientists predicted he was on route to his Arctic homeland, which is likely to be Greenland or Norway.

It is not known if this latest migrant is the same one, but people have been urged to keep their distance.

It is unclear how the creature ended up in the North East as they usually reside hundreds of miles away towards the Arctic Sea

It is unclear how the creature ended up in the North East as they usually reside hundreds of miles away towards the Arctic Sea

It is unclear how the creature ended up in the North East as they usually reside hundreds of miles away towards the Arctic Sea

It comes just a month after the world's most famous walrus was spotted alive and well in Iceland, almost a month since he was last seen off Ireland's southwesterly coast

It comes just a month after the world's most famous walrus was spotted alive and well in Iceland, almost a month since he was last seen off Ireland's southwesterly coast

It comes just a month after the world’s most famous walrus was spotted alive and well in Iceland, almost a month since he was last seen off Ireland’s southwesterly coast

Resident Jake Bates, who took the pictures, said: ‘I was sat home when one of my friends who works for Serenity Boats down at Seahouses got in touch.

‘He does trips to the Farne Islands and I got a message from him saying there was a walrus down there.

‘He said it was super rare so I went running down to get a photo of it and it’s still down there now.

‘Somebody told me it this hasn’t happened here in 100 years. I don’t know if it’s been that long, but I know it’s a long time.

‘When I got down there was only me, the guy who messaged me and his boat skipper who was getting a video and just a couple of other people.

‘By the time I was leaving though, there was loads of other people starting to come down but they weren’t getting too close.’

The RSPCA have been made aware of the discovery and Jake noticed experts arriving as he was leaving.

The 24-year-old local, who runs his own media and marketing business, added: ‘It looked it was just having a nap. It would lift its head up and have a look about before going back to sleep.

‘The marine medics came down as I was leaving and they were making sure people were staying back.

‘From what I understand, the marine medics said it was in good health. I’ve never seen a walrus there before. 

‘We were speaking earlier and talking about where it could have come from.

‘We thought that Iceland might have been the closest place it could have travelled from but there’s not too many of that type there from what we understand.

‘We were thinking it might have come from further afield.’

The wandering walrus captured the imagination of wildlife lovers around the world with his European travels this summer, which included stops in France, Spain and the Isles of Scilly

The wandering walrus captured the imagination of wildlife lovers around the world with his European travels this summer, which included stops in France, Spain and the Isles of Scilly

The wandering walrus captured the imagination of wildlife lovers around the world with his European travels this summer, which included stops in France, Spain and the Isles of Scilly

It is not known if this latest migrant is the same one, but people have been urged to keep their distance

It is not known if this latest migrant is the same one, but people have been urged to keep their distance

It is not known if this latest migrant is the same one, but people have been urged to keep their distance

The Tynemouth Seal Hospital have issued an update to urge people to respect the walrus and keep their distance.

It read: ‘We are aware of the reports of a walrus in the local area, and would urge people to please give it as much space and rest as possible.

‘This animal is out of it’s normal area and will need to rest and build it’s strength back up.

‘The RSPCA and BDMLR (British Divers Marine Life Rescue) are aware.

‘Please, please follow safe Wildlife distancing for this animal to make sure it stays safe.’

Source: Daily Mail UK

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