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The Rolling Stones will reportedly alter their world famous logo on their upcoming tour in tribute to their late bandmate Charlie Watts.  

Sir Mick Jagger, 78, Keith Richards, 77, and Ronnie Wood, 74, have decided to make their tongue logo from red to black in memory of drummer Charlie who died last month aged 80.

According to The Sun, the new logo will be projected onto screens on the tour and will also be used on the band’s merchandise.

Tribute: The Rolling Stones will reportedly alter their world famous logo on their upcoming tour in tribute to their late bandmate Charlie Watts (L-R, Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger and Charlie Watts in 2016)

Tribute: The Rolling Stones will reportedly alter their world famous logo on their upcoming tour in tribute to their late bandmate Charlie Watts (L-R, Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger and Charlie Watts in 2016)

Tribute: The Rolling Stones will reportedly alter their world famous logo on their upcoming tour in tribute to their late bandmate Charlie Watts (L-R, Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger and Charlie Watts in 2016)

A source said: ‘They don’t want it to be a concert that is a downer because they know fans have paid good money to see them.

‘But it feels only right that they referenced Charlie’s passing because he was such a vital part of the band and it will be strange for them all to not have him there.

‘They think the plans make for a fitting tribute.’

MailOnline has contacted representatives of The Rolling Stones for comment. 

Change: Sir Mick Jagger, 78, Keith Richards, 77, and Ronnie Wood, 74, have decided to make their tongue logo from red to black in memory of drummer Charlie who died last month aged 80

Change: Sir Mick Jagger, 78, Keith Richards, 77, and Ronnie Wood, 74, have decided to make their tongue logo from red to black in memory of drummer Charlie who died last month aged 80

Change: Sir Mick Jagger, 78, Keith Richards, 77, and Ronnie Wood, 74, have decided to make their tongue logo from red to black in memory of drummer Charlie who died last month aged 80

The Rolling Stones were reportedly forced to miss Charlie’s funeral, which took place last week in Devon, due to Covid-19 restrictions.

The group have remained in Boston amid pandemic rules where they are rehearsing for their rescheduled world tour which begins on September 26 in St Louis, Missouri. 

Sam Cutler, the band’s former tour manager said it was fitting to learn his funeral had been private and believes he would have hated ‘the fuss’ that involving the public would have brought.

Writing about Charlie in The Mirror, Sam said he hated touring and bemoaned the fact he had to leave his house in order to play.

A source said: 'They don't want it to be a concert that is a downer because they know fans have paid good money to see them' (pictured in 2012)

A source said: 'They don't want it to be a concert that is a downer because they know fans have paid good money to see them' (pictured in 2012)

A source said: ‘They don’t want it to be a concert that is a downer because they know fans have paid good money to see them’ (pictured in 2012)

He also said the drummer was completely devoted to his wife Shirley and would spend all his money on tour on phone calls with her.

He wrote: ‘Theirs was a dreamily harmonious and loving relationship of mutual respect based upon the undeniably deep bonds of one another’s hearts.

‘They showed us all how to commit to the dream of love. Charlie loved Shirley with an abiding sincerity and passion his whole life.’

Sam added: ‘Charlie, was in some senses, an anomaly. In the entertainment industry where bluster, fluster and muster are all, Charlie remained quietly confident, almost serene in his laid-back attitude, and possessed of an evergreen sense of humour.’ 

Relationship: Sam Cutler, the band's former tour manager, said Charlie was 'devoted' to his wife Shirley (pictured together in 1992)

Relationship: Sam Cutler, the band's former tour manager, said Charlie was 'devoted' to his wife Shirley (pictured together in 1992)

Relationship: Sam Cutler, the band’s former tour manager, said Charlie was ‘devoted’ to his wife Shirley (pictured together in 1992)

The musician died on August 24 aged 80 with a statement saying he had ‘passed away peacefully in hospital surrounded by his family’.

It had been announced on August 5 that Charlie would not take part in the upcoming tour due to a recent emergency surgery and had been replaced with Steve Jordan.

He said in a statement: ‘After all the disappointment with delays to the tour caused by Covid, I really don’t want the many Stones fans in the States to have another postponement or cancellation.

‘I have therefore asked my great friend Steve Jordan to stand in for me.’

Ceremony: The group were unable to attend the small private ceremony in Devon which took place last week (pictured together in 2014)

Ceremony: The group were unable to attend the small private ceremony in Devon which took place last week (pictured together in 2014)

Ceremony: The group were unable to attend the small private ceremony in Devon which took place last week (pictured together in 2014)

Along with Mick and Keith, Charlie featured on every one of the band’s studio albums. He was widely regarded as one of the greatest drummers of all time.

His London publicist, Bernard Doherty, confirmed his passing in a statement, saying: ‘It is with immense sadness that we announce the death of our beloved Charlie Watts.

‘He passed away peacefully in a London hospital earlier today surrounded by his family.

‘Charlie was a cherished husband, father and grandfather and also as a member of The Rolling Stones one of the greatest drummers of his generation.

Travel: The band have remained in Boston amid pandemic rules where they are rehearsing for their rescheduled world tour which begins on September 26 in St Louis, Missouri (pictured in 2005)

Travel: The band have remained in Boston amid pandemic rules where they are rehearsing for their rescheduled world tour which begins on September 26 in St Louis, Missouri (pictured in 2005)

Travel: The band have remained in Boston amid pandemic rules where they are rehearsing for their rescheduled world tour which begins on September 26 in St Louis, Missouri (pictured in 2005)

‘We kindly request that the privacy of his family, band members and close friends is respected at this difficult time.’

In 2004, Charlie was treated for throat cancer at London’s Royal Marsden Hospital and he was given the all-clear after a four-month battle with the disease, involving six weeks of intensive radiotherapy treatment.

The drummer was diagnosed after discovering a lump on the left side of his neck.

Doctors performed a biopsy which confirmed the tumour was malignant and he was diagnosed with throat cancer in June that year.

History: Alongside frontman Sir Mick and guitarist Keith, Charlie (pictured centre) was among the longest-standing members of the Stones, which has seen a shifting line-up of musicians including Mick Taylor, Ronnie and Bill Wyman

History: Alongside frontman Sir Mick and guitarist Keith, Charlie (pictured centre) was among the longest-standing members of the Stones, which has seen a shifting line-up of musicians including Mick Taylor, Ronnie and Bill Wyman

History: Alongside frontman Sir Mick and guitarist Keith, Charlie (pictured centre) was among the longest-standing members of the Stones, which has seen a shifting line-up of musicians including Mick Taylor, Ronnie and Bill Wyman

His spokesman said at the time that Charlie’s treatment had ‘not interfered with any tour or recording plans for the group, who have been ‘relaxing between work commitments”.

Following his recovery, the band began work on their 22nd studio album, A Bigger Bang.

Charlie, who reportedly gave up smoking in the 1980s, said during an interview with Rolling Stone magazine at the time that he felt ‘very lucky’ doctors had caught the cancer early.

Statement: Charlie's publicist Bernard Doherty said: 'Charlie was a cherished husband, father and grandfather and also as a member of The Rolling Stones one of the greatest drummers of his generation'

Statement: Charlie's publicist Bernard Doherty said: 'Charlie was a cherished husband, father and grandfather and also as a member of The Rolling Stones one of the greatest drummers of his generation'

Statement: Charlie’s publicist Bernard Doherty said: ‘Charlie was a cherished husband, father and grandfather and also as a member of The Rolling Stones one of the greatest drummers of his generation’

Source: Daily Mail UK

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