Share

EXCLUSIVE: University of York is ‘founded on social justice and combating inequality’… but pays black women 41% less than white men as UCU boss tells Russell Group unis to ‘hang their heads in shame’

  • The University of York paid black women 41 per cent less than white men 
  • It means for every £1 a white man at York earned, a black woman only got 59p
  • MailOnline found two thirds of Russell Group universities paid BAME staff less

<!–

<!–

<!– <!–

<!–
(function (src, d, tag){ var s = d.createElement(tag), prev = d.getElementsByTagName(tag)[0]; s.src = src; prev.parentNode.insertBefore(s, prev); }(“https://www.dailymail.co.uk/static/gunther/1.17.0/async_bundle–.js”, document, “script”));
<!– DM.loadCSS(“https://www.dailymail.co.uk/static/gunther/gunther-2159/video_bundle–.css”);
<!–

One of Britain’s top universities claims to stand for social justice and fighting inequality but actually paid black women almost half as much as white men, MailOnline can reveal.

The University of York paid black women 41 per cent less than white men in the last recorded year, meaning for every £1 a white man earned, a black woman only got 59p. 

FEMAIL can also reveal that two thirds of Russell Group universities have paid black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) staff less than their white peers.

Jo Grady, the general secretary of the University and College Union, told MailOnline: ‘It should shame every single Russell Group vice chancellor that black women are paid up to 41 per cent less than white men [at York].

‘Universities are sites of mass inequality and there are huge pay gaps when it comes to race, gender and disability. 

FEMAIL can also reveal that two thirds of Russell Group universities pay black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) staff less than their white peers. Top of the list was KCL, which paid BAME staff 19.1 per cent less

FEMAIL can also reveal that two thirds of Russell Group universities pay black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) staff less than their white peers. Top of the list was KCL, which paid BAME staff 19.1 per cent less

The University of York (pictured) is in the top five for highest ethnic pay gaps among the Russell Group universities

The University of York (pictured) is in the top five for highest ethnic pay gaps among the Russell Group universities

York (pictured, the campus) paid black women a whopping 41 per cent less than white men, meaning for every £1 a white man earns, a black woman only gets 59p

York (pictured, the campus) paid black women a whopping 41 per cent less than white men, meaning for every £1 a white man earns, a black woman only gets 59p

University and College Union general secretary Jo Grady (pictured) told MailOnline Britain's top universities should be ashamed of the findings

University and College Union general secretary Jo Grady (pictured) told MailOnline Britain’s top universities should be ashamed of the findings

‘This is a direct result of institutions employing disproportionate numbers of these marginalised groups on insecure contracts, which deny them proper terms, conditions and security.

‘They should hang their heads in shame.

‘We need universities to sit down with their local union branches to agree action plans to address this disgrace. 

‘Staff will not stand for it any longer. We have just voted in unprecedented numbers to strike unless the structural inequalities, low pay and poor working conditions that blight higher education are fixed. 

‘The sector has the money to fix these issues and now it must do so.’

The University of York claimed on its website it has a ‘rich tradition’ of fighting against inequality.

It said: ‘The University of York exists for public good.

‘Our founders endowed the University with a strong social purpose, drawing on a rich tradition of social justice and combating inequality in a way that is distinctive to the city of York.’

York paid its BAME staff 14.8 per cent less than their white counterparts in the last recorded year and when the University published its strategy for the next decade it mentioned its large ethnicity pay gap just once. 

The University did not respond to a request for comment from MailOnline. 

LSE Director Baroness Minouche Shafik (pictured) is the only top university boss who is BAME and a woman. LSE does not publish ethnicity pay gap data

LSE Director Baroness Minouche Shafik (pictured) is the only top university boss who is BAME and a woman. LSE does not publish ethnicity pay gap data

The only other BAME vice chancellor at a Russell Group university is Professor Shitij Kapur at KCL, which has the highest of all the Group's ethnicity pay gaps at 19.1 per cent

The only other BAME vice chancellor at a Russell Group university is Professor Shitij Kapur at KCL, which has the highest of all the Group’s ethnicity pay gaps at 19.1 per cent

It is not only the University of York with a high ethnicity pay gap. 

MailOnline can reveal the three top universities with the worst ethnicity pay gaps were all in London.

King’s College London paid its BAME staff 19.1 per cent less, Queen Mary’s (QMUL) paid 18.3 per cent less and Imperial paid 17.8 per cent less.

KCL responded to the findings by saying: ‘We were proud that 400 cleaning and security staff chose to become employees of King’s from an outsourced agency in 2019. 

‘This contributed to an increase in our ethnicity pay gap and while we are making progress to close it, we acknowledge that we have more work to do.’

Ethnicity pay gaps across Britain’s top universities have caused concern at many institutions but some have argued the figures don’t represent the true problem.

Newcastle University said the figures were less about the BAME community being paid less than their white colleagues and more about the low number of BAME people in top roles.

It said because BAME people generally had more junior roles they were naturally paid less.

Newcastle said it was ‘committed to addressing’ the low number of BAME people in top jobs. 

The sentiment was echoed by the University of Birmingham’s Deputy Pro-Vice Chancellor for equality Prof Joanne Duberley, who said the pay gap was ‘not an equal pay issue’ about ‘different rates of pay for the same job’.

She said: ‘Addressing this issue of workforce imbalance is a priority for the University through recruitment and development of minority ethnic staff at all levels.’

Many other universities have committed to working towards better representation in top roles.

One of them is QMUL, which has the second highest ethnicity pay gap in the Russell Group.

A spokeswoman for the University said it paid all staff equally if they are doing the same job but ‘we do not have equal numbers of staff from different ethnic backgrounds across all our graded job roles’.

She added: ‘To close the overall pay gap we continue to work hard to have equal distribution of staff within the organisation.’

Universities in London such as KCL (pictured) made up the top three in terms of worst ethnicity pay gaps

Universities in London such as KCL (pictured) made up the top three in terms of worst ethnicity pay gaps

At Imperial College London (pictured) BAME staff were paid 17.8 per cent less than white staff at the university

At Imperial College London (pictured) BAME staff were paid 17.8 per cent less than white staff at the university

Queen's University Belfast (pictured) was one of three universities in the Russell Group to pay its BAME staff more than white staff

Queen’s University Belfast (pictured) was one of three universities in the Russell Group to pay its BAME staff more than white staff

The lack of BAME people in senior roles is even more obvious at the very highest of levels at Britain’s top universities. 

BAME people account for 13 per cent of the UK’s population.

Yet there are just two BAME vice chancellors at Russell Group universities and only one of them is a woman, Baroness Minouche Shafik at LSE.

Every other university in the group has a white vice chancellor and 15 of the 24 are men. 

Although Leeds is one of just eight Russell Group universities with a female vice chancellor it is also one of the four top institutions that hasn’t revealed its ethnicity pay gap statistics.

A spokesperson for the University said: ‘Our aim is to also produce accurate and meaningful ethnicity pay gap data and we are focusing on ensuring that high-quality source data is available to enable us to do this.’

Oxford, LSE and Sheffield also do not publish their ethnicity pay gap. 

When approached by MailOnline, the Department of Education said it wouldn’t comment on the findings as ‘we don’t have any control [over what universities pay staff].’

The Department added: ‘There isn’t anything we can do about what universities pay.’ 

Although some universities question what an ethnicity pay gap really represents, many have acknowledged that more needs to be done to fight pay inequality. 

A University of Cambridge spokesman said: ‘The pay gap is based on the difference in average pay across the workforce, rather than the difference in like-for-like roles. 

‘The University is committed to equality of opportunity, and although this year we saw a reduction in the ethnic pay gap, there is more work to be done in addressing the root cause of the pay gap and creating a culture where all can thrive.’ 

At the University of Warwick a spokesperson said: ‘The gender pay gap at the University of Warwick has been reduced by 4.9 per cent in 2021, while there has been a doubling of the number of BAME appointments at senior academic levels as well as more staff who declare a disability at such levels.

‘There is still much work to be done and we have introduced several schemes and plans to move the University further forward in this area.’

A University of Edinburgh spokeswoman said: ‘The University is committed to ensuring our pay structures and reward processes are free from bias. 

‘We acknowledge that more needs to be done to address pay gap challenges.’ 

The University of Manchester said there was ‘more work to be done’ but their ethnicity pay gap has been decreasing.

It said: ‘The main factor contributing to our pay gaps is the under-representation of women, BAME and disabled staff in higher paid jobs and functions, and not as a result of staff being paid differently for work of equal value.’

The University of Exeter said: ‘Staff within the same grade are paid the same regardless of colour. 

‘However, we recognise that BAME staff are underrepresented in senior grades and we continue to invest in a range of actions to support the career progression of people of colour.’

The remaining 14 top universities, as well as the Russell Group itself, have not responded to requests for comment. 

Two thirds of Russell Group universities pay BAME staff less than white staff

Russell Group university  How much are BAME staff paid in comparison to white staff?
King’s College London (KCL) 19.1 per cent lower 
Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL)  18.3 per cent lower 
Imperial College London  17.8 per cent lower 
Newcastle University 15.1 per cent lower for non-clinical academics, 4.4 per cent lower for all other BAME staff 
University of York  14.8 per cent lower 
University College London  13.7 per cent lower 
University of Manchester  13.3 per cent lower 
University of Exeter  13.0 per cent lower 
University of Birmingham  12.2 per cent lower 
University of Nottingham  11.7 per cent lower 
University of Warwick  10.8 per cent lower 
University of Edinburgh  7.1 per cent lower 
University of Southampton  6.3 per cent lower 
University of Bristol  5.2 per cent lower 
University of Cambridge  2.9 per cent lower 
Cardiff University  0.4 per cent lower 
Queen’s University Belfast  2.0 per cent higher 
University of Glasgow  2.0 per cent higher 
Durham University  5.6 per cent higher 
University of Liverpool  10.9 per cent higher (compared to white British)
University of Leeds  Does not publish ethnicity pay gap data
London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) Does not publish ethnicity pay gap data 
University of Oxford  Does not publish ethnicity pay gap data 
University of Sheffield Does not publish ethnicity pay gap data 

Source: Daily Mail UK

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

WP Radio
WP Radio
OFFLINE LIVE