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Vermont state leaders came together at the statehouse to publicly apologize Saturday afternoon for a dark chapter in the state’s history.Elected officials apologized for the state’s eugenics surveys that were conducted in the 1930s.During that time, people with disabilities, Native Americans and other minority groups were all targets of state-sanctioned eugenics practices, which focused on sterilization, segregation and institutionalization of any Vermonter who was deemed “less than”.Chief Don Stevens of the Nulhegan Abenaki Tribe said he wishes his ancestors could have been here to hear the state’s apology.”I wish my grandmother was here to see it because she was affected by this and changed her name several times to avoid the sterilization program because she was actually in the eugenics survey. So for me, I’m glad (the state apologized). I think it’s due. I wish (my grandmother) could have been here,” Stevens said. Several of the Native American Tribes that attended the public apology said they appreciate the state’s acknowledgment of its wrongdoings, adding that they now want to move forward.

Vermont state leaders came together at the statehouse to publicly apologize Saturday afternoon for a dark chapter in the state’s history.

Elected officials apologized for the state’s eugenics surveys that were conducted in the 1930s.

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During that time, people with disabilities, Native Americans and other minority groups were all targets of state-sanctioned eugenics practices, which focused on sterilization, segregation and institutionalization of any Vermonter who was deemed “less than”.

Chief Don Stevens of the Nulhegan Abenaki Tribe said he wishes his ancestors could have been here to hear the state’s apology.

“I wish my grandmother was here to see it because she was affected by this and changed her name several times to avoid the sterilization program because she was actually in the eugenics survey. So for me, I’m glad (the state apologized). I think it’s due. I wish (my grandmother) could have been here,” Stevens said.

Several of the Native American Tribes that attended the public apology said they appreciate the state’s acknowledgment of its wrongdoings, adding that they now want to move forward.

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