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There were no speeches and precious little time for a glass of bubbly afterwards. And there was certainly no heart to heart.

But Princes William and Harry did manage to put their bitter personal animosity to one side for just over an hour to honour their mother, Diana, Princess of Wales.

The unveiling of the highly anticipated statue in her memory in the Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace, her former London home, was, according to one of those present, ‘very moving and dignified’.

It may have taken place almost four years later than planned, largely due to the brothers’ cataclysmic falling-out, but the fact it happened at all was nothing short of a miracle to many.

The statue’s design was top secret and appears to be inspired by Diana’s official 1993 Christmas card – her first sent without Prince Charles – where she wears the same open ribbed shirt, skirt and belt as she smiles lovingly at her two sons. 

But rather than depict her with her boys as she appeared in the card, she is posed with three children – two of whom are not wearing shoes. One of the boys in the statue appears to have short afro-style hair. The palace said ‘it represents the universality and generational impact of The Princess’ work.’

Prince Charles was not present at the ceremony, which was changed to a ‘private event’ instead of the large celebration to mark Diana’s life as originally intended. 

The move to scale back the unveiling was largely due to bad blood between the brothers and Harry’s determination to control media coverage – and was only broadcast after it was over and the Duke of Sussex was leaving. The statue was in situ for a week prior to yesterday’s unveiling, but was hidden away from prying eyes under a black crate.

The Duke of Cambridge (left) and Duke of Sussex look at a statue they commissioned of their mother Diana, Princess of Wales

It appears to be inspired by Diana's official 1993 Christmas card - her first sent without Prince Charles - where she wears the same outfit open shirt and skirt as she smiles lovingly at her two sons

It appears to be inspired by Diana's official 1993 Christmas card - her first sent without Prince Charles - where she wears the same outfit open shirt and skirt as she smiles lovingly at her two sons

It appears to be inspired by Diana’s official 1993 Christmas card – her first sent without Prince Charles – where she wears the same outfit open shirt and skirt as she smiles lovingly at her two sons

But rather than depict her with her sons as she appeared in the card, she is posed with three children - two of whom aren't wearing shoes. The palace said 'it represents the universality and generational impact of The Princess’ work'

But rather than depict her with her sons as she appeared in the card, she is posed with three children - two of whom aren't wearing shoes. The palace said 'it represents the universality and generational impact of The Princess’ work'

But rather than depict her with her sons as she appeared in the card, she is posed with three children – two of whom aren’t wearing shoes. The palace said ‘it represents the universality and generational impact of The Princess’ work’

The brothers smiled as at the same time they pulled away the green cover to reveal the bronze sculpture by Ian Rank-Broadley

The brothers smiled as at the same time they pulled away the green cover to reveal the bronze sculpture by Ian Rank-Broadley

The brothers smiled as at the same time they pulled away the green cover to reveal the bronze sculpture by Ian Rank-Broadley

Harry and William’s joint statement following the unveiling of a statue of their mother Princess Diana

Today, on what would have been our Mother’s 60th birthday, we remember her love, strength and character – qualities that made her a force for good around the world, changing countless lives for the better.

Every day, we wish she were still with us, and our hope is that this statue will be seen forever as a symbol of her life and her legacy.

Thank you to Ian Rank-Broadley, Pip Morrison and their teams for their outstanding work, to the friends and donors who helped make this happen, and to all those around the world who keep our mother’s memory alive. 

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Although the public and media were excluded, crowds gathered in Kensington Gardens, where the late princess liked to jog and even roller-skate, keen to feel part of the day. 

Much to the surprise of the crowd, Diana’s siblings – brother Earl Spencer, and sisters Lady Sarah McCorquodale and Lady Jane Fellowes – quietly walked in front of the palace, apparently searching for the way in.

They glanced at the well-wishers before their presence started to cause a stir – and police officers ushered them in.

At 1.32pm – just 28 minutes before the ceremony was due to start – Harry was waved through the gates in a chauffeur-driven car.

By the time he parked and walked through the cobbled palace courtyard towards the Sunken Garden, which is in the public area of the palace (as opposed to the private apartments where William and Kate live – as Harry and Meghan once did), he would have barely spent ten minutes with his elder brother. 

In fact, sources said he was greeted not by William but by James Holt, a former press officer at Kensington Palace who has since defected to the Sussexes and now heads up their Archewell Foundation.

Waiting on the newly turfed lawn – next to the statue covered with a billowing green silk drape – were the Spencer family, who glanced up as William and Harry appeared from the Orangery area.

The bronze made by Ian Rank-Broadley shows Diana with her arms around two children with another child following behind, and towered over the brothers as they revealed it to the world this afternoon.

The bronze made by Ian Rank-Broadley shows Diana with her arms around two children with another child following behind, and towered over the brothers as they revealed it to the world this afternoon.

The bronze made by Ian Rank-Broadley shows Diana with her arms around two children with another child following behind, and towered over the brothers as they revealed it to the world this afternoon.

Harry beamed as he looked around the sunken garden in Kensington Palace after the statue of his mother was unveiled

Harry beamed as he looked around the sunken garden in Kensington Palace after the statue of his mother was unveiled

Harry beamed as he looked around the sunken garden in Kensington Palace after the statue of his mother was unveiled 

Harry looked to be in good spirits as he called over to family members from his mother's side at the statue unveiling

Harry looked to be in good spirits as he called over to family members from his mother's side at the statue unveiling

Harry was seen speaking to family members

Harry was seen speaking to family members

Harry looked to be in good spirits as he called over to family members from his mother’s side at the statue unveiling 

The brothers stood apart as they spoke to family members and special guests at the Diana statue unveiling

The brothers stood apart as they spoke to family members and special guests at the Diana statue unveiling

The brothers stood apart as they spoke to family members and special guests at the Diana statue unveiling

Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, Earl Spencer and Lady Sarah McCorquodale view the statue of Diana after the unveiling

Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, Earl Spencer and Lady Sarah McCorquodale view the statue of Diana after the unveiling

Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, Earl Spencer and Lady Sarah McCorquodale view the statue of Diana after the unveiling 

The bronze made by Ian Rank-Broadley shows Diana with her arms around two children with another little boy following behind

The bronze made by Ian Rank-Broadley shows Diana with her arms around two children with another little boy following behind

The bronze made by Ian Rank-Broadley shows Diana with her arms around two children with another little boy following behind

In front of it is a paving stone engraved with an extract after the poem The Measure of A Man by Albert Schweitzer, which was read at the 2017 memorial service marking the 20th anniversary of her death. It read: 'These are the units to measure the worth Of this woman as a woman regardless of birth. Not what was her station? But had she a heart? How did she play her God-given part?'

In front of it is a paving stone engraved with an extract after the poem The Measure of A Man by Albert Schweitzer, which was read at the 2017 memorial service marking the 20th anniversary of her death. It read: 'These are the units to measure the worth Of this woman as a woman regardless of birth. Not what was her station? But had she a heart? How did she play her God-given part?'

In front of it is a paving stone engraved with an extract after the poem The Measure of A Man by Albert Schweitzer, which was read at the 2017 memorial service marking the 20th anniversary of her death. It read: ‘These are the units to measure the worth Of this woman as a woman regardless of birth. Not what was her station? But had she a heart? How did she play her God-given part?’

The brothers made a point of walking in together, safe in the company of Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton. 

It was a smart move. Once their principal private secretary, ex-Special Forces officer Mr Lowther-Pinkerton, who is godfather to Prince George and whose son, Billy, was a pageboy at William and Kate’s wedding, is discretion personified and trusted by both men.

As they walked in, William told Harry, 36: ‘Great isn’t it, amazing little place’, The Sun reports.

Harry looked to be the more comfortable of the brothers and giggled at one point.

He was seen yelling cross the garden with his hands cupped around his mouth and laughed uproariously as he larked around – but William appeared far more serious throughout the short ceremony after 18 months of barely talking to his younger sibling since he emigrated.

Harry clapped his hands when he reached sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley and glanced over at the statue, which – ironically, given the Duchess of Cambridge’s notable absence yesterday – was flanked by two planters blooming with white ‘William and Catherine’ roses.

Although much will be made of pictures showing William and Harry smiling, their interaction, in truth, was thin on the ground.

It was only as they approached the statue for the unveiling that the brothers, whose relationship has been driven to breaking point by the shocking allegations made by the Sussexes in their Oprah Winfrey interview, were seen to properly speak, and even then their conversations were clearly centred around the event itself.

When the two dukes got into place either side of the statue, William simply said ‘ready?’ before they pulled off the cloth, and the guests applauded. There were no speeches. 

Harry also spoke to Earl Spencer, his mother's brother, at the Spencer-dominated event, shaking his hand

Harry also spoke to Earl Spencer, his mother's brother, at the Spencer-dominated event, shaking his hand

Harry also spoke to Earl Spencer, his mother’s brother, at the Spencer-dominated event, shaking his hand

William and Harry spoke as they walked towards the statue, in the garden where Harry posed with Meghan when they became engaged 

The Duke of Sussex (left) and the Duke of Cambridge (second right) greet their aunts Lady Sarah McCorquodale (second left) and Lady Jane Fellowes (right) with kisses

The Duke of Sussex (left) and the Duke of Cambridge (second right) greet their aunts Lady Sarah McCorquodale (second left) and Lady Jane Fellowes (right) with kisses

The Duke of Sussex (left) and the Duke of Cambridge (second right) greet their aunts Lady Sarah McCorquodale (second left) and Lady Jane Fellowes (right) with kisses

The statue of Princess Diana was created by renowned artist Ian Rank-Broadley (pictured), whose image of the Queen has appeared on all coins in the UK and Commonwealth since 1998

The statue of Princess Diana was created by renowned artist Ian Rank-Broadley (pictured), whose image of the Queen has appeared on all coins in the UK and Commonwealth since 1998

The statue of Princess Diana was created by renowned artist Ian Rank-Broadley (pictured), whose image of the Queen has appeared on all coins in the UK and Commonwealth since 1998

Harry and William are seen speaking to garden designer Pip Morrison during the unveiling of a statue they commissioned of their mother

Harry and William are seen speaking to garden designer Pip Morrison during the unveiling of a statue they commissioned of their mother

Harry and William are seen speaking to garden designer Pip Morrison during the unveiling of a statue they commissioned of their mother

William and Harry smile as they enter the Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace on what would have been their mother's 60th birthday

William and Harry smile as they enter the Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace on what would have been their mother's 60th birthday

William and Harry smile as they enter the Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace on what would have been their mother’s 60th birthday

Outside the palace hundreds arrived to pay their respects to Diana on her 60th birthday

Outside the palace hundreds arrived to pay their respects to Diana on her 60th birthday

Outside the palace hundreds arrived to pay their respects to Diana on her 60th birthday

Meanwhile, mourners gathered at the gates of Kensington Palace to mark what would have been Diana's 60th birthday

Meanwhile, mourners gathered at the gates of Kensington Palace to mark what would have been Diana's 60th birthday

Meanwhile, mourners gathered at the gates of Kensington Palace to mark what would have been Diana’s 60th birthday

Royal fan John Loughrey poses with balloons as supporters gather to mark what would have been the 60th birthday of Princess Diana

Royal fan John Loughrey poses with balloons as supporters gather to mark what would have been the 60th birthday of Princess Diana

Royal fan John Loughrey drinks a toast in front of the gates

Royal fan John Loughrey drinks a toast in front of the gates

Royal fan John Loughrey poses with balloons as supporters gather to mark what would have been the 60th birthday of Princess Diana – before drinking a toast from a special wine glass

Diana super fan Anne Daley travelled all the way from Cardiff to get to London

Diana super fan Anne Daley travelled all the way from Cardiff to get to London

Diana super fan Anne Daley travelled all the way from Cardiff to get to London

The style of clothing worn by the princess in the statue was one she favoured. Pictured: Diana leaving Wetherby School in London with Prince William in 1991.

The style of clothing worn by the princess in the statue was one she favoured. Pictured: Diana leaving Wetherby School in London with Prince William in 1991.

Diana at the Royal Brompton Hospital in 1995

Diana at the Royal Brompton Hospital in 1995

The style of clothing worn by the princess in the statue was one she favoured. Left: Diana leaving Wetherby School in London with Prince William in 1991. Right: Diana at the Royal Brompton Hospital in 1995

‘There is a hint of Theresa May’: Diana statue draws comparisons to former PM as it divides opinion

A statue of Princess Diana unveiled in the gardens of Kensington Palace drew unlikely comparisons to Theresa May, as other commentators said it looked ‘stunning’ and ‘made them cry’. 

‘There is a hint of Theresa May’, wrote one Twitter user next to a mocked-up image of the bronze, while another added: ‘Can’t disagree unfortunately, that’s Theresa May right there’. 

The statue by Ian Rank-Broadley depicts Princess Diana in the ‘more confident’ later years of her life aims to reflect her ‘warmth, elegance and energy’, the sculptor said – as it was met with a mixed reaction. 

Well-wishers called the monument ‘lovely’ and ‘gorgeous’, while one Twitter user wrote: ‘Wonderful, I knew it would be Diana with kids.’

Royal expert Penny Junor told MailOnline: ‘I think it looks stunning. And I love the larger than life size and the fact that she has three children with her. It looks like a magnificent piece of art.’ 

However, others called the bronze unrealistic, with one commentator writing: ‘Ok, I’ll be the first to say it, I’m underwhelmed by the statue. Not a good likeness of Diana and what is she wearing?’ 

MOCK-UP: The statue drew unlikely comparisons among Twitter users to former Prime Minister Theresa May

MOCK-UP: The statue drew unlikely comparisons among Twitter users to former Prime Minister Theresa May

MOCK-UP: The statue drew unlikely comparisons among Twitter users to former Prime Minister Theresa May

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Afterwards, the brothers issued a rare joint statement, as if to emphasise their brief moment of unity. It said: ‘Today, on what would have been our mother’s 60th birthday, we remember her love, strength and character – qualities that made her a force for good around the world, changing countless lives for the better.

‘Every day, we wish she were still with us, and our hope is that this statue will be seen for ever as a symbol of her life and her legacy.’

Champagne was laid on for the party on the outside terrace of the Kensington Palace Pavilion. 

It is thought Harry stayed for a polite drink after the event ended at 2.45pm – but by 3.05pm he was driven out of the palace gates, relief on his face.

It is not known if he was heading back to Frogmore Cottage, where he may be meeting his grandmother the Queen who has just returned to Windsor for the annual horse show after a tour of Scotland. 

Or he could have been heading to Heathrow to jet back to LA to be with Meghan, Archie and Lilibet. 

There are also rumours of a ‘lads’ lunch’ organised with former school and Army friends. 

Cast in bronze by Castle Fine Arts Foundry in the traditional ‘lost-wax’ process with a patina of a bluish green over black, the statue is hollow and supported by a stainless-steel armature. It is 1.25 times life size and shows Diana surrounded by three children.

The portrait and style of dress featured was based on the ‘final period of her life as she gained confidence in her role as an ambassador for humanitarian causes’, they said. It added that the statue ‘aims to convey her character and compassion’. 

Beneath the statue is a plinth engraved with the Princess’ name and the date of the unveiling. 

In front of the statue is a stone engraved with an extract inspired by the poem, The Measure of a Man, which featured in the programme at Diana’s 2007 memorial: ‘These are the units to measure the worth of this woman as a woman regardless of birth. Not what was her station? But had she a heart? How did she play her God-given part?’ 

Speaking after the unveiling, sculptor Mr Rank-Broadley  told how William and Harry shared poignant private moments of fun and joy from their time with their late mother to convey her personality. He said he hoped the statue might provide some ‘solace’ for the two brothers.

‘I think that their mother is there in a real physical sense, perhaps in the evening when the grounds are shut they could easily come here for a moment of quiet reflection and I hope that will give them some sort of comfort or solace,’ he said

Mr Rank-Broadley added: ‘Uppermost in my mind was to do something for the princes, the princess was a very public figure and in many respects an icon but she was somebody’s mother. So I paid the greatest heed to both princes in what they had to say.

Diana statue sculptor crafted Queen’s head that appears on all British coins 

The statue of Princess Diana was created by renowned artist Ian Rank-Broadley,  whose image of the Queen has appeared on all coins in the UK and Commonwealth since 1998. 

The 69-year-old is one of the most renowned British sculptors, and produced a bronze depicting the harrowing realities of war that became the focal point of the Armed Forces Memorial at the National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire.   

Born in Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, the artist was educated at Epsom School of Art and the Slade School before continuing his studies at the British School in Rome. 

On his return to the UK he set up as a professional sculptor specialising in carved panels on monuments. In recognition of his talents he was made a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths in 1996 and granted the Freedom of the City of London. 

Among his royal connections, he is a trustee to The Prince’s School of Traditional Arts, which was set up by the Prince of Wales in 2005.  His works are in the permanent collections of the British Museum, London’s National Portrait Gallery, the Ashmolean Museum, Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge and St Paul’s Cathedral. 

Announcing Mr Rank-Broadley’s appointment in 2017, the Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry said: ‘Ian is an extremely gifted sculptor and we know that he will create a fitting and lasting tribute to our mother.

‘We look forward to unveiling the statue, which will allow all those who visit Kensington Palace to remember and celebrate her life and legacy.’

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‘And in many ways it was a collaborative effort, they made a huge contribution, in many ways I could say the sculpture belongs to them as well – they helped make it.’

Asked what direct involvement William and Harry had in the process, he replied: ‘Unfortunately I never knew the princess, I never met her, so I was reliant on what friends and family would say. One gets a flavour, there might be anecdotes, reminiscences and particular views, so they contributed in that way.

‘They described their mother and in many ways there were private moments that were related – one certainly got the feeling she was an enormous amount of fun and (loved) playing jokes.

‘That helps you create a person, so when I’m on my own in the studio, and I’m just modelling the clay, I got a feeling I’m beginning to know somebody. And towards the end of the commission, I really felt as though I knew a Diana.’ 

Mr Rank-Broadley highlighted the hands-on approach of William and Harry: ‘They would send photographs on a regular basis at all the different stages, visits were made to my studio so they were well aware at how it was progressing.’

The sculptor explained the children stood with Diana in the statue were not based on living individuals, adding: ‘I think we felt if the princess stood on her own in solitary fashion she might appear isolated.

‘And one of the things that came across in talking to her friends and family was she was such a friendly and gregarious person, and she had a particular warmth for children. And in many ways it alludes to her humanitarian work and shows she was a great comfort.’

In the crowd outside the palace was ‘super-fan’ John Loughrey who, along with a group of friends, had spent more than £2,500 decorating the palace gates with banners, balloons and flowers.

Mr Loughrey, 66, said: ‘Diana’s legacy is now in stone and it will be here for thousands of years to come.’

Reacting to images of the Princes, royal author Penny Junor told The Times: ‘The brothers put on a very, very good show. 

‘I was expecting to see some sort of tight lips and some jaw muscles, which we saw at the Commonwealth service in Westminster Abbey before Harry and Meghan left.

‘They seemed to be reasonably relaxed with one another.’

The brothers are said to have barely spoken and have an ‘incredibly strained’ relationship after two years of rows over Harry’s wife and her alleged treatment of staff, the couple’s decision to emigrate to America and the tonnes of ‘truth bombs’ the Sussexes have dropped in TV interviews watched by tens of millions of people around the world. 

Harry and Meghan believe they were abandoned by the Royal Family, even accusing them of racism towards Archie and ignoring their cries for help when the Duchess of Sussex felt lonely and suicidal while pregnant in London. 

Harry was pictured smiling as he left Kensington Palace after around 90 minutes. It is not known if he is heading back to the US

Harry was pictured smiling as he left Kensington Palace after around 90 minutes. It is not known if he is heading back to the US

Harry was pictured smiling as he left Kensington Palace after around 90 minutes. It is not known if he is heading back to the US 

Harry may be meeting the Queen (pictured), who was back at Windsor on Thursday after a tour of Scotland

Harry may be meeting the Queen (pictured), who was back at Windsor on Thursday after a tour of Scotland

Harry may be meeting the Queen (pictured), who was back at Windsor on Thursday after a tour of Scotland

Diana's siblings Earl Spencer, Lady Jane Fellowes and Sarah McCorquodale are seen attending the unveiling

Diana's siblings Earl Spencer, Lady Jane Fellowes and Sarah McCorquodale are seen attending the unveiling

Diana’s siblings Earl Spencer, Lady Jane Fellowes and Sarah McCorquodale are seen attending the unveiling

The statue commission who advised William and Harry on selecting the final design 

Princes William and Harry put their personal animosity to one side this afternoon to unveil a statue of their late mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, on what would have been her 60th birthday.

The private ceremony, which started at 2pm, saw Diana’s sons gather along with the princess’ siblings The Earl Spencer, The Lady Sarah McCorquodale, and The Lady Jane Fellowes.

They were also joined by the Statue Committee, a six-strong board of which Lady Sarah McCorquodale was a member.

It was tasked with commissioning and privately raising funds for the creation of the statue.

The committee also advised on the selection of the sculptor and worked with Historic Royal Palaces on the statue’s installation. 

Also on the committee was Julia Samuel, a godparent of Prince George who was also a close friend of the princess. The Duchess of Sussex is said to have turned to Mrs Samuel when she struggled with her mental health during pregnancy. 

The committee was chaired by former SAS Major Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton, who served as principal private secretary for William and Harry for eight years. 

His son Billy was a pageboy at Wlliam and Kate’s wedding and he was later asked to be a godfather to Prince George. Mr Lowther-Pinkerton was also equerry to the Queen Mother, in the 1980s.

Also part of the committee was John Barnes, the Chief Executive of Historic Royal Palaces, the independent charity established by Royal Charter and contracted to look after six royal sites and 1,000 acres of formal gardens and lands.

Gallery owner Gerry Farrell was selected for the committee for his artistic direction. He is director of the Sladmore Contemporary gallery, which specialises in sculptures. 

Guy Monson was the final member of the committee and is a city financier and trustee of the Invictus Games Foundation.  

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It seems the England football team have achieved the  near unthinkable as their 2-0 victory has helped bring about a thaw in the icy relations between Princes William and Harry, sparking a flurry of messages between them after the match. 

Sources close to their uncle Earl Spencer, who was at the statue unveiling, have said that there is a hope that the celebration of their mother’s life and legacy will bring them together again. 

Charles Spencer famously delivered a defiant eulogy at Diana’s funeral in 1997, pledging to his sister ‘that we, your blood family’ would follow her lead and continue to steer her sons ‘so that their souls are not simply immersed by duty and tradition but can sing openly as you planned’.   

Omid Scobie, the Sussexes’ preferred royal reporter, played down the idea of a public reconciliation. 

Harry and William have been working together on the project since 2017 – but Mr Scobie has said they both vehemently believe the ceremony is about their mother – and not them. 

He said: ‘What we will see is two brothers being professional in a moment that is not about them. This is going to be a moment we see them put everything to one side. We will just see professionalism and nothing else’.

The Diana statue has been in situ for more than a week after being lifted into a crate during the early hours of yesterday morning.

A Palace source yesterday said: ‘The statue has been here for more than a week. But it’s inside a crate and cannot be seen.

‘It was lifted into the crate by a crane in the early hours of the morning so that nobody was around and it could be kept secret.

‘The Sunken Garden, where the statue will be unveiled, has been re-landscaped over the last couple of years to be brought back in to line with the Pond Garden at Hampton Court, on which it’s based.

‘The Diana statue is the focal point but the work has cost Historic Royal Palaces quite a bit and it’s been a struggle to pay because of the pandemic, which closed Kensington Palace – and the other HRP sites – to the public for a number of months.’

The warring brothers have barely exchanged a word since the Duke and Duchess of Sussex announced their acrimonious departure from the Royal Family 18 months ago.

But the Daily Mail understands they have been in contact in recent days. They are even said to have exchanged a few phone messages over England’s win on Tuesday.

‘Not what was her station, but has she a heart?’ Moving lines of verse engraved by Diana statue 

In front of it is a paving stone engraved with an extract after the poem The Measure of A Man by Albert Schweitzer, which was read at the 2017 memorial service marking the 20th anniversary of her death.

It read: ‘These are the units to measure the worth. Of this woman as a woman regardless of birth. Not what was her station? But had she a heart? How did she play her God-given part?’

Schweitzer was a French theologian, writer and philosopher who lived from 1875 to 1965. He is well-known for his writing on Christian mysticism. 

In 1952, he received a Nobel Peace Prize for a work of philosophy, becoming the eighth Frenchman to be awarded that prize.

Princess Diana was known to enjoy poetry, and was once given one in a silver frame by Dodi Al Fayed. Harry has also recited poems on public occasions, as has his wife Meghan.   

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While insiders are quick to stress that it is far from a full-scale rapprochement, it is the most positive sign yet that the estranged brothers will be able to put their differences to one side.

‘It is still far from good between them,’ the source explained. ‘

But there has apparently been an exchange of messages, particularly about the football, which is a step in the right direction, if only to do honour to their mother.’

William, who is president of the Football Association, attended the match at Wembley with wife Kate and their football-mad eldest son George.

Royal insiders have also told the Mail that Harry, 36, has been told how much the family had been hoping to see his two-year-old son Archie again and look forward to his return to the UK soon. 

It is believed the Cambridges have seen Archie only once or twice since he was born.

The statue unveiling is three and a half years overdue, in large part due to the collapse in relations between the brothers.

William, 39, is known to be deeply hurt and angry at the way Harry ‘pressed the nuclear button’ not just on his relationship with the monarchy, but the family itself.

One impeccable source said they ‘highly doubted’ that the two brothers would ever regain ‘even a semblance’ of the closeness they once enjoyed.

‘Too much water has gone under the bridge for that,’ they said. 

‘Harry and Meghan’s decision to burn so many bridges behind them and make such terrible allegations against their family in that infamous Oprah interview, knowing they will never be in a position to defend themselves, has taken its toll. What little trust there was has been well and truly destroyed.’

But the source acknowledged there may be some hope the brothers could eventually paper over their schism, enough at least for their children – who are cousins, after all – to develop some sort of long-distance relationship.

‘It would be a great shame if Archie and Lilibet never really got to know George, Charlotte and Louis,’ they admitted.

Police directed the public as Earl Spencer arrived at Kensington Palace ahead of the event

Police directed the public as Earl Spencer arrived at Kensington Palace ahead of the event

Police directed the public as Earl Spencer arrived at Kensington Palace ahead of the event

Diana's family were welcomed into the palace grounds ahead of the ceremony

Diana's family were welcomed into the palace grounds ahead of the ceremony

Diana’s family were welcomed into the palace grounds ahead of the ceremony 

The brothers both smiled as the statue was revealed, with Harry collecting the cover from his older brother

The brothers both smiled as the statue was revealed, with Harry collecting the cover from his older brother

The brothers both smiled as the statue was revealed, with Harry collecting the cover from his older brother

Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, the Duke of Cambridge and the Duke of Sussex after the unveiling of a statue

Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, the Duke of Cambridge and the Duke of Sussex after the unveiling of a statue

Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, the Duke of Cambridge and the Duke of Sussex after the unveiling of a statue

William looked largely serious as they walked together this afternoon at the private event

William looked largely serious as they walked together this afternoon at the private event

William looked largely serious as they walked together this afternoon at the private event

The Duke of Cambridge (second left) and Duke of Sussex (second right) talk to, Rupert Gavin, Chairman of Historic Royal Palaces (left) and Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton (right) the former Private Secretary to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

The Duke of Cambridge (second left) and Duke of Sussex (second right) talk to, Rupert Gavin, Chairman of Historic Royal Palaces (left) and Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton (right) the former Private Secretary to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

The Duke of Cambridge (second left) and Duke of Sussex (second right) talk to, Rupert Gavin, Chairman of Historic Royal Palaces (left) and Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton (right) the former Private Secretary to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

The Duke of Sussex (centre) with his aunt Lady Jane Fellowes and uncle Earl Spencer, making them laugh

The Duke of Sussex (centre) with his aunt Lady Jane Fellowes and uncle Earl Spencer, making them laugh

The Duke of Sussex (centre) with his aunt Lady Jane Fellowes and uncle Earl Spencer, making them laugh

Harry spoke at length to her aunt at the event that was not broadcast live

Harry spoke at length to her aunt at the event that was not broadcast live

Harry spoke at length to her aunt at the event that was not broadcast live

The Duke of Sussex greets Julia Samuel, founder of Child Bereavement UK, with a kiss ahead of the unveiling

The Duke of Sussex greets Julia Samuel, founder of Child Bereavement UK, with a kiss ahead of the unveiling

The Duke of Sussex greets Julia Samuel, founder of Child Bereavement UK, with a kiss ahead of the unveiling

The Duke of Sussex ahead of the unveiling of a statue, pointing at the pool at the centre of the garden

The Duke of Sussex ahead of the unveiling of a statue, pointing at the pool at the centre of the garden

The Duke of Sussex ahead of the unveiling of a statue, pointing at the pool at the centre of the garden

Earl Spencer, Lady Sarah McCorquodale (right) and Lady Jane Fellowes (left) leaving Kensington Palace Prince

Earl Spencer, Lady Sarah McCorquodale (right) and Lady Jane Fellowes (left) leaving Kensington Palace Prince

Earl Spencer, Lady Sarah McCorquodale (right) and Lady Jane Fellowes (left) leaving Kensington Palace Prince

Harry was swept away in his convoy - it is not known if he and William held a meeting but the Duke of Sussex was only there for 90 minutes

Harry was swept away in his convoy - it is not known if he and William held a meeting but the Duke of Sussex was only there for 90 minutes

Harry was swept away in his convoy – it is not known if he and William held a meeting but the Duke of Sussex was only there for 90 minutes

Together at last, Harry and William walk to the unveiling of their mother's statue as their own relationship was under strain

Together at last, Harry and William walk to the unveiling of their mother's statue as their own relationship was under strain

Together at last, Harry and William walk to the unveiling of their mother’s statue as their own relationship was under strain

Prince Harry is driven into Kensington Palace through the side entrance as he and Prince William unveil the Diana statue

Prince Harry is driven into Kensington Palace through the side entrance as he and Prince William unveil the Diana statue

Prince Harry is driven into Kensington Palace through the side entrance as he and Prince William unveil the Diana statue

Prince Williams drives in London this morning ahead of his reunion with his brother

Prince Williams drives in London this morning ahead of his reunion with his brother

Although they have barely spoken in the past 18 months, Prince Harry (pictured yesterday) and Prince William have shared celebratory messages about England's historic victory over Germany at the Euros on Tuesday when the Three Lions knocked them out with a 2-0 win

Although they have barely spoken in the past 18 months, Prince Harry (pictured yesterday) and Prince William have shared celebratory messages about England's historic victory over Germany at the Euros on Tuesday when the Three Lions knocked them out with a 2-0 win

Prince Williams drives in London this morning ahead of his reunion with his brother, who attended a charity event at Kew yesterday

Charles Spencer, brother of Britain's Princess Diana, arrives with sisters Lady Sarah McCorquodale and Lady Jane Fellowes

Charles Spencer, brother of Britain's Princess Diana, arrives with sisters Lady Sarah McCorquodale and Lady Jane Fellowes

Charles Spencer, brother of Britain’s Princess Diana, arrives with sisters Lady Sarah McCorquodale and Lady Jane Fellowes

MailOnline can reveal that the Diana statue has been in situ for more than a week after being lifted into this crate during the early hours of the morning

MailOnline can reveal that the Diana statue has been in situ for more than a week after being lifted into this crate during the early hours of the morning

MailOnline can reveal that the Diana statue has been in situ for more than a week after being lifted into this crate during the early hours of the morning

A member of the public leaves a tribute to Princess Diana outside the 'Golden Gates' at Kensington Palace

A member of the public leaves a tribute to Princess Diana outside the 'Golden Gates' at Kensington Palace

A member of the public leaves a tribute to Princess Diana outside the ‘Golden Gates’ at Kensington Palace

This note left with flowers, pictures and flags remembered Diana's special smile, face and their memories of her

This note left with flowers, pictures and flags remembered Diana's special smile, face and their memories of her

This note left with flowers, pictures and flags remembered Diana’s special smile, face and their memories of her

Crowds began to build ahead of the unveiling at 2pm

Crowds began to build ahead of the unveiling at 2pm

Crowds began to build ahead of the unveiling at 2pm

Pedestrians look at wreaths and pictures attached to the gates of Kensington Palace to celebrate what would have been Princess Diana's 60th birthday - a poignant day for her sons

Pedestrians look at wreaths and pictures attached to the gates of Kensington Palace to celebrate what would have been Princess Diana's 60th birthday - a poignant day for her sons

Pedestrians look at wreaths and pictures attached to the gates of Kensington Palace to celebrate what would have been Princess Diana’s 60th birthday – a poignant day for her sons

Friends hold homemade banners wishing Diana a happy birthday and declaring their love for her

Friends hold homemade banners wishing Diana a happy birthday and declaring their love for her

Friends hold homemade banners wishing Diana a happy birthday and declaring their love for her

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, his wife Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, and their son Prince George celebrate the first goal. The brothers are understood to have texted afterwards

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, his wife Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, and their son Prince George celebrate the first goal. The brothers are understood to have texted afterwards

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, his wife Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, and their son Prince George celebrate the first goal. The brothers are understood to have texted afterwards

Her sons Princes William and Harry have worked closely with the team at Kensington Palace to re-design the garden, filling it with glorious scented blooms loved by their adored mother 

The redesigned Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace, London, home to the new Diana, Princess of Wales statue, which has been filled with more than 4,000 flowers and offers a "calmer and more reflective setting"

The redesigned Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace, London, home to the new Diana, Princess of Wales statue, which has been filled with more than 4,000 flowers and offers a "calmer and more reflective setting"

The redesigned Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace, London, home to the new Diana, Princess of Wales statue, which has been filled with more than 4,000 flowers and offers a ‘calmer and more reflective setting’

Royal fan John Loughrey poses for a picture outside Kensington Palace

Royal fan John Loughrey poses for a picture outside Kensington Palace

Royal fan John Loughrey poses for a picture outside Kensington Palace

The world's media has gathered, but the ceremony will be limited to one film crew and one photographer

The world's media has gathered, but the ceremony will be limited to one film crew and one photographer

The world’s media has gathered, but the ceremony will be limited to one film crew and one photographer

Paintings of Diana from the Excellence in Education Charity in Lagos which Diana visited  - with a picture of her with her two sons

Paintings of Diana from the Excellence in Education Charity in Lagos which Diana visited  - with a picture of her with her two sons

Paintings of Diana from the Excellence in Education Charity in Lagos which Diana visited  – with a picture of her with her two sons

A jogger passes the gates of Kensington Palace as he runs through the gardens towards Hyde Perk

A jogger passes the gates of Kensington Palace as he runs through the gardens towards Hyde Perk

A jogger passes the gates of Kensington Palace as he runs through the gardens towards Hyde Perk

Two mourners hug as they mark what would have been Diana's 60th birthday

Two mourners hug as they mark what would have been Diana's 60th birthday

Two mourners hug as they mark what would have been Diana’s 60th birthday

The brothers will be reunited for the unveiling of a statue of their beloved mother. Flowers spelling out her name have been placed at the gate with banners and pictures

The brothers will be reunited for the unveiling of a statue of their beloved mother. Flowers spelling out her name have been placed at the gate with banners and pictures

The brothers will be reunited for the unveiling of a statue of their beloved mother. Flowers spelling out her name have been placed at the gate with banners and pictures

Pictured: Prince William, who is President of the Football Association, converses with David Beckham during the UEFA Euro 2020 Championship Round of 16 match between England and Germany at Wembley Stadium, London, on Tuesday afternoon

Pictured: Prince William, who is President of the Football Association, converses with David Beckham during the UEFA Euro 2020 Championship Round of 16 match between England and Germany at Wembley Stadium, London, on Tuesday afternoon

Pictured: Prince William, who is President of the Football Association, converses with David Beckham during the UEFA Euro 2020 Championship Round of 16 match between England and Germany at Wembley Stadium, London, on Tuesday afternoon

Harry and Wills’ kisses for their aunts: Princes greet Diana’s sisters Lady Sarah McCorquodale and Lady Jane Fellowes as they join Earl Spencer to unveil statue of their mother at Kensington Palace

Princess Diana‘s siblings reunited at Kensington Palace to see the statue unveiled in their sister’s honour. 

Lady Sarah McCorquodale, 66, Lady Jane Fellowes, 64, and Charles, Earl Spencer, 57, joined their nephews Prince William, 39, and Prince Harry, 36, for the intimate ceremony in the remodelled Sunken Garden. 

Lady Sarah and Lady Jane beamed as they greeted their nephews with a kiss on the cheek in the beautiful garden, which was replanted with 4,000 of Diana’s favourite flowers for the occasion. 

The event, held on what would have been Princess Diana’s 60th birthday, was attended by just a handful of people including Diana’s sons and three siblings, as well as the Statue Committee, the sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, garden designer Pip Morrison and Chair of Historic Royal Palaces, Rupert Gavin. 

Kisses for their aunts: Lady Sarah McCorquodale, 66, left, beamed as she greeted her nephew Prince Harry, 36, with a kiss on the cheek in the Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace. Right, Prince William, 39, with Lady Jane Fellowes, 64

Kisses for their aunts: Lady Sarah McCorquodale, 66, left, beamed as she greeted her nephew Prince Harry, 36, with a kiss on the cheek in the Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace. Right, Prince William, 39, with Lady Jane Fellowes, 64

Kisses for their aunts: Lady Sarah McCorquodale, 66, left, beamed as she greeted her nephew Prince Harry, 36, with a kiss on the cheek in the Sunken Garden at Kensington Palace. Right, Prince William, 39, with Lady Jane Fellowes, 64

Lovely to see you! Prince Harry shared a light-hearted moment with his uncle and aunts during the short event this afternoon

Lovely to see you! Prince Harry shared a light-hearted moment with his uncle and aunts during the short event this afternoon

Lovely to see you! Prince Harry shared a light-hearted moment with his uncle and aunts during the short event this afternoon

Precious moments: The aunts, Princess Diana's older sisters, looked delighted to see their nephews at the intimate event. The statue was unveiled in the Sunken Garden - one of Diana's favourite spots - on what would have been her 60th birthday

Precious moments: The aunts, Princess Diana's older sisters, looked delighted to see their nephews at the intimate event. The statue was unveiled in the Sunken Garden - one of Diana's favourite spots - on what would have been her 60th birthday

Precious moments: The aunts, Princess Diana’s older sisters, looked delighted to see their nephews at the intimate event. The statue was unveiled in the Sunken Garden – one of Diana’s favourite spots – on what would have been her 60th birthday

Family time: Prince Harry chats to his aunt Lady Jane Fellowes and uncle Earl Spencer at the unveiling of the statue

Family time: Prince Harry chats to his aunt Lady Jane Fellowes and uncle Earl Spencer at the unveiling of the statue

Family time: Prince Harry chats to his aunt Lady Jane Fellowes and uncle Earl Spencer at the unveiling of the statue

In good spirits: Earl Spencer, who oversees the family estate of Althorp, smiled as he chatted to Prince Harry

In good spirits: Earl Spencer, who oversees the family estate of Althorp, smiled as he chatted to Prince Harry

In good spirits: Earl Spencer, who oversees the family estate of Althorp, smiled as he chatted to Prince Harry

The Duke of Cambridge (left) and Duke of Sussex look at a statue they commissioned of their mother Diana, Princess of Wales

Admiring: Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, Earl Spencer and Lady Sarah McCorquodale after the unveiling of the statue

Admiring: Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, Earl Spencer and Lady Sarah McCorquodale after the unveiling of the statue

Admiring: Sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley, Earl Spencer and Lady Sarah McCorquodale after the unveiling of the statue 

What had originally been planned as a large celebration to mark her life has now been classed as a ‘private event’ – largely due to bad blood between the brothers and Harry’s determination to control media coverage.   

The statue was commissioned by the brothers in 2017 to memorialise their mother and mark the 20th anniversary of her death. Kensington Palace said the princes ‘wanted the statue to recognise her positive impact in the UK and around the world, and help future generations understand the significance of her place in history’.

‘The statue aims to reflect the warmth, elegance and energy of Diana, Princess of Wales, in addition to her work and the impact she had on so many people,’ it added.

The portrait and style of dress featured was based on the ‘final period of her life as she gained confidence in her role as an ambassador for humanitarian causes’, they said. It added that the statue ‘aims to convey her character and compassion’. Beneath the statue is a plinth engraved with the Princess’ name and the date of the unveiling.

In front of it is a paving stone engraved with an extract after the poem The Measure of A Man by Albert Schweitzer, which was read at the 2017 memorial service marking the 20th anniversary of her death. It read: ‘These are the units to measure the worth Of this woman as a woman regardless of birth. Not what was her station? But had she a heart? How did she play her God-given part?’

Reunited: Princess Diana's eldest sister Lady Sarah McCorquodale and younger brother Earl Spencer (right) arriving

Reunited: Princess Diana's eldest sister Lady Sarah McCorquodale and younger brother Earl Spencer (right) arriving

Reunited: Princess Diana’s eldest sister Lady Sarah McCorquodale and younger brother Earl Spencer (right) arriving

Close family: Earl Spencer with Lady Sarah (back to camera) and Lady Jane (in green, right) before the intimate ceremony

Close family: Earl Spencer with Lady Sarah (back to camera) and Lady Jane (in green, right) before the intimate ceremony

Close family: Earl Spencer with Lady Sarah (back to camera) and Lady Jane (in green, right) before the intimate ceremony

Remembering their sister: Earl Spencer follows his sister Lady Jane (foreground) to the Sunken Garden at the palace

Remembering their sister: Earl Spencer follows his sister Lady Jane (foreground) to the Sunken Garden at the palace

Remembering their sister: Earl Spencer follows his sister Lady Jane (foreground) to the Sunken Garden at the palace

Private event: Earl Spencer, Lady Jane (behind, in green) and Lady Sarah (back to camera) ahead of the ceremony

Private event: Earl Spencer, Lady Jane (behind, in green) and Lady Sarah (back to camera) ahead of the ceremony

Private event: Earl Spencer, Lady Jane (behind, in green) and Lady Sarah (back to camera) ahead of the ceremony

Dapper: Earl Spencer looked smart in a suit and tie as he arrived for the event at Kensington Palace

Dapper: Earl Spencer looked smart in a suit and tie as he arrived for the event at Kensington Palace

Earl Spencer

Earl Spencer

Dapper: Earl Spencer looked smart in a suit and tie as he arrived for the event at Kensington Palace this afternoon

Diana mourners camp outside Kensington Palace to be there on her 60th birthday 

Royal well wishers at Kensington Palace, London Prince William and Harry are to unveil Diana Statute at Kensington Palace

Royal well wishers at Kensington Palace, London Prince William and Harry are to unveil Diana Statute at Kensington Palace

Royal well wishers at Kensington Palace, London Prince William and Harry are to unveil Diana Statute at Kensington Palace

The statue, which was moved to the palace overnight, is three and a half years overdue, in part because of the collapse in relations between the feuding brothers William and Harry

The statue, which was moved to the palace overnight, is three and a half years overdue, in part because of the collapse in relations between the feuding brothers William and Harry

The statue, which was moved to the palace overnight, is three and a half years overdue, in part because of the collapse in relations between the feuding brothers William and Harry

By James Fielding

Royal super fans have been camped outside Kensington Palace since 5am this morning as the long-awaited statue in memory of Princess Diana is unveiled this morning.

Friends Sky London, 61, John Loughrey, 66, Maria Scott, 50 and her daughter Amy Thompson, 21, were sat on camping chairs draped in the Union flag.

They have spent £2,500 and ten hours festooning the gates of the palace with images of Diana, floral tributes, flags and balloons on what would have been her 60th birthday.

A statue dedicated to the princess, who died in a car crash in Paris in 1997, is being unveiled at 2pm in the Sunken Garden outside her former London residence.

It has been commissioned by her two sons Princes William and Harry, who will be reunited this afternoon at the unveiling ceremony following their well-publicised spat.

The statue, which was moved to the palace overnight, is three and a half years overdue, in part because of the collapse in relations between the feuding brothers.

William and Harry have barely spoken a word since the Duke and Duchess of Sussex announced their split from the Royal Family 18-months ago.

But Mr Loughrey, from Streatham, South London, said: ‘I think it’s great that both brothers are putting their differences aside for their mother.

‘I think that’s really important.

‘We’ve been here since 5am and we are going to stay for the rest of the day covered in our flags watching the unveiling on our phones.

‘I think it’s going to be a wonderful day and I think that statue is going to look fantastic. I think it will be made from brass and go really well with the gardens.’

Ms Scott and her daughter had travelled down to London from their home in Newcastle at the weekend and are stopping in a hotel near Kensington Gardens.

She said: ‘We’ve probably spent the best part of 10-hours – on and off since Saturday – decorating the gate.

‘We’ve all chipped in and probably spent about £2,500 but we’re not bothered about the money, it’s for our love for the Royals.

‘I’m really pleased that Harry has flown in specially from America and will be with his brother to see the statue in honour of their mother.’

Amy added: ‘We’ve trawled around a lot of florists and charity shops looking for pictures of Diana. I hope William and Harry see what we’ve done and like it.’

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Source: Daily Mail UK

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